Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

according to my understanding, the TID(thread id) returned by gettid() is unique inside a process(or inside a program with multiple processes, while each process may have multiple threads), namely, inside a process, different thread has different thread id.

the TID returned by pthread_self() is unique across processes, namely, on the same machine, different thread has different TID on the same machine at the same time.

Is my understanding correct or not?

besides, how can a thread get the TID(corresponds to gettid()) of its derived thread? thanks!

share|improve this question
2  
gettid() returns something completely different then pthread_self(), although both identify the same thread. – alk May 17 '13 at 13:35
2  
    
@GrijeshChauhan: Depends on what you want to achieve... ;-) – alk May 17 '13 at 13:39
    
I know this, just I want to know more details, which are in my questions – misteryes May 17 '13 at 13:42
    
@GrijeshChauhan - no answer was accepted, so its not clear the correct answer has been provided in stackoverflow.com/questions/6372102/…. – jww Dec 3 '13 at 22:56
up vote 1 down vote accepted

pthread_self() returns the process-wide unique pthread-id.

gettid() returns the (pthread implementation specific) system-wide unique thread-id (on Linux).


the TID(thread id) returned by gettid() is unique inside a process

Yes.

(or inside a program with multiple processes,

Yes.

inside a process, different thread has different thread id.

Yes.

the TID returned by pthread_self() is unique across processes,

No.

different thread has different TID on the same machine at the same time.

Yes in the same process, No across the whole machine.


As gettid() is Linux specific and therefore not portable, the only way to system widely identify a pthread is to use its (system wide unique) parent process id as returned by getpid() along with its (process-wide unique) pthread-id as returned by pthread_self().

share|improve this answer
    
I know this, just I want to know more details, which are in my questions – misteryes May 17 '13 at 13:39
    
@misteryes: What is not in my answer, what you want to know? – alk May 17 '13 at 13:40
    
Is my understanding correct or not?how can a thread get the TID(corresponds to gettid()) of its derived thread? – misteryes May 17 '13 at 13:43
    
@misteryes: please see my updated answer. – alk May 17 '13 at 13:50
    
it seems to me that gettid() will occupy many process id. if a thread is allocated with the value of gettid(), that value can't be used by other processes during the thread's active time. right? – misteryes May 17 '13 at 14:17

To put a bit of implementation context to this question, on Linux:

  1. gettid() returns a value corresponding to a thread's entry in the kernel process scheduler (very similar to what getpid() is perceived to be). This is something scheduling priorities and affinities can be set upon.

  2. pthread_self() returns a pointer to the vicinity of TLS (thread local storage) slot of the calling thread in the process memory map. Obviously, by definition of what TLS is, this value is unique within a given process (and can be mapped to kernel TID and back), but it can not possibly be unique system wide, because every process has the same virtual address range.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that on Linux, the gettid() is the SAME value reported by the unix tools 'top', 'htop', 'pidstat -t' and 'ps -ef'. This helps developers to correlate a troublesome process with a specific thread. The 'pidstat -t' tool will help identify excessive thread context switching. – J Jorgenson Oct 2 '14 at 15:25

In my observations pthread_self() is NOT unique within a process. It is unique at any given moment in time. But when threads terminate and other threads are started while the process is running, they may reuse pthread_self() values already used before by other threads.

share|improve this answer
1  
"... observations pthread_self is NOT unique within a process" - Correct. Its documented at pthread_self(3): "A thread ID may be reused after a terminated thread has been joined, or a detached thread has terminated". – jww Dec 3 '13 at 23:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.