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As a very simple approach to "responsive design", I have two version of CSS for a website I'm working on:

  • a regular (non-mobile) version that should display on any devices with the screen wider than 700px;
  • a streamlined mobile version, to be displayed on any device with the screen equal in width, or narrower than 700px.

I used @media only screen and (max-device-width : 700px) query to separate the two sets of CSS rules.

I also use this JavaScript snippet to assign viewport meta tag parameters based on the width of the screen:

<script type="text/javascript">

var width = screen.width;
var height = screen.height; 
var meta = document.createElement("meta");
var head = document.getElementsByTagName("head")[0];

if (width >= 700) {
    meta.setAttribute("name", "viewport");
    meta.setAttribute("content", "width=1000");
    head.appendChild(meta);
} else if (width <700) {
    meta.setAttribute("name", "viewport");
    meta.setAttribute("content", "width=device-width; initial-scale=1; maximum-scale=1");
    head.appendChild(meta);
};

</script>

The script sets the width of the viewport to 1000px if the device has the screen width >= 700px, essentially making sure that the entire width of the non-mobile version of the website fits within the screen, and sets initial scale to 1 if the screen width is less than 700px.

Again, just to clarify, what I want to accomplish is this: when the screen width is > 700px, show regular (non-mobile) website; when the screen width is <= 700px, show streamlined (mobile) website.

The results surprised me:

  • Samsung Galaxy S (480x800) - non-mobile version, landscape and portrait positions
  • Samsung Galaxy S II (480x800) - non-mobile version, landscape and portrait positions
  • Motorola Droid Razr (540x960) - non-mobile version, landscape and portrait positions
  • Motorola Droid 4 (540x960) - non-mobile version, landscape and
    portrait positions
  • Motorola Photon 4G (540x960) - non-mobile version, landscape and portrait positions
  • Motorola Atrix HD (720x1280) - mobile version (!), landscape and portrait positions (even though both screen dimensions are wider than would satisfy the mobile query!)
  • Motorola Razr (540x960) - mobile version, landscape and portrait positions (even though its landscape position is wider than 700px)
  • HTC Wildfire (240x320) - non-mobile version (!), landscape and portrait positions (even though it has the smallest screen dimensions, both way smaller than 700px!)
  • Sony Xperia X10 (480x854) - mobile version, portrait and landscape positions (even though its landscape position is wider than 700px)
  • LG Optimus 3D (480x800) - non-mobile version, portrait and
    landscape positions
  • Amazon Kindle Fire 2 (600x1024) - mobile version, portrait and landscape positions (even though its wider dimension is way above 700px)

From what I see, I conclude that mobile devices are a mess. Most devices seem to recognize the highest dimension as the max-width, but some (Amazon Kindle 2) appear to treat lower dimension as the "width" and higher as the "height". Some devices have screen dimensions below 700px but "pretend" to have higher ones.

It seems that I used faulty logic when I tried to use max-device-width of 700 as the defining factor for a media query.

Question: to create a media query that would cover as many devices as possible with the following rule: "if the current width of the screen is <= 700px, apply the mobile CSS" – what should be the proper additional conditions?

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

have you included the viewport meta tag?

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Mozilla/Mobile/Viewport_meta_tag

After seeing your viewport script I'm wondering if this is causing the issue

var width = screen.width;

if (width >= 700) {
    meta.setAttribute("name", "viewport");
    meta.setAttribute("content", "width=1000");
    head.appendChild(meta);
}

Wont the width variable be set to over 700 since at the time it queries the screen width, the device will be defaulting to scale the page?

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Thank you, @Duncan. Yes, of course, I do use the viewport meta tag, in fact, I actually added a little JavaScript snippet to control what parameters are added to the viewport meta tag, depending on the screen width. I am adding this to the question. –  Dimitri Vorontzov May 17 '13 at 14:13
    
I assume that you are adding the 2 stylesheets in the right order? If your mobile styles are added first they might be overwritten by the 'standard' ones. look at media queries after base styles compared to media queries before base styles –  Duncan Beattie May 17 '13 at 14:28
    
Interesting thought, @Duncan. Let me test this. (The styles are in the right order, of course, regular CSS first. –  Dimitri Vorontzov May 17 '13 at 14:41
    
I'm back – and your most recent suggestion was a major step in the right direction, @Duncan. I set the width to device-width, and the site now shows consistently as mobile across the majority of mobile devices. One problem though: it now shows as mobile even on the devices whose width is actually higher than 700px. Any suggestions on how to handle that? –  Dimitri Vorontzov May 17 '13 at 15:06
    
could you update the question with some specifics about the devices wtill causing issues and ideally the relevant code from the document <head> and the @media query itself? –  Duncan Beattie May 17 '13 at 15:16
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As Duncan mentions, add the viewport tag.

Ideally set it to something like:

<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0">

And then adjust your media query to use max-width rather than max-device-width.

I'd be interested to see your test results after making those changes.

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Yep, @Ian, I have viewport meta handled, even though not in a very stanadard way. Please take a look at the edited question. –  Dimitri Vorontzov May 17 '13 at 14:14
    
Update: changing max-device-width to max-width didn't have any effect at all, @Ian, on any of the devices. –  Dimitri Vorontzov May 17 '13 at 14:26
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