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I'm looking for some advice on speeding up queries in SQL Azure. This is an example of the two queries we're running, when we add a WHERE clause on there, the queries grind to a halt.

Both columns, theTime and orderType are indexed. Can anyone suggest how to make these run faster, or things to do to the query to make it more efficient?

5.2 seconds:

sum(cast(theTime AS INT)) as totalTime from Orders

20.2 seconds:

 sum(cast(theTime AS INT)) as totalTime from Orders WHERE orderType='something_in_here'

Here's the relevant information:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Orders] (
[ID] int IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
[orderType] nvarchar(90) COLLATE SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS NULL,
[orderTime] nvarchar(90) COLLATE SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS NULL,

CONSTRAINT [PrimaryKey_fe2bdbea-c65a-0b85-1de9-87324cc29bff] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED ([ID]) 
WITH (IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF)
)
GO
CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [orderTime]
ON [dbo].[Orders] ([orderTime] ASC)
WITH (IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF,
STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF,
ONLINE = OFF)
GO
CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [actiontime_int]


CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [orderType]
ON [dbo].[Orders] ([orderType] ASC)
WITH (IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF,
STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF,
ONLINE = OFF)
GO
share|improve this question
1  
Just so you know, 20.2s-5.2s is 15s, not 20+s –  David Starkey May 17 '13 at 14:09
    
Sorry - wrote the question, then re-ran the queries to get exact times to copy/paste :) –  Daniel Sharp May 17 '13 at 14:10
    
I'm lost - do you want a COUNT or do you want the TOP (1000000) rows? Not sure I understand why you have both here. A COUNT will only return one row. –  Aaron Bertrand May 17 '13 at 14:14
2  
Also, is theTime nullable? If so, you are probably getting a clustered index scan or an index scan + key lookup. In which case maybe consider adding theTime as an INCLUDE column to the index on orderType. This assumes your query makes any sense at all - are you meaning to discard rows from the count when theTime is NULL? If not, just use SELECT COUNT(*). –  Aaron Bertrand May 17 '13 at 14:18
1  
Single column indexes are most of the time pretty much useless. You can drop them both and create one like Aaron suggested - ON ordertype INCLUDE theTime .... or ON ordertype, thetime –  Nenad Zivkovic May 17 '13 at 14:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I suspect your query is not doing what you think. It is taking the first million counts, rather than the count of the first million rows. I think you want:

select sum(cast(theTime AS INT))
from (select top (1000000) Orders
      from Orders
     ) t

versus:

select sum(cast(theTime AS INT))
from (select top  (1000000) Orders
      from Orders
      WHERE orderType='something_in_here'
     ) t

My suspicion is that using the index actually slows things down, depending on the selectivity of the where clause.

In the original query, you are reading all the data, sequentially. This is fast, because the pages just cycle through the processor.

Going through the index slows things down, because the pages are not read in order. You may be still be reading all the pages (if every page has a matching row), but they are no longer being read in "physical" or "logical" order. They are being read in the order of the index -- which is likely to be random.

share|improve this answer
    
Solved using a combination of multi column indexes and sub query listed here. Now running the whole thing in 2.8 seconds across all 15m rows! Thanks all. –  Daniel Sharp May 17 '13 at 14:37

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