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I am using Nokogiri (1.5.9 - java) in JRuby ( 1.6.7.2 ) to copy an XML template and edit it. I'm having problems finding elements in the cloned document.

lblock = doc.xpath(".//lblock[@blockName='WINDOW_LIST']").first
lblock.children = new_children # kind of NodeSet or Node
copy_doc = doc.dup( 1 ) # or dup(0)
lblock = copy_doc.xpath(".//lblock[@blockName='WINDOW_LIST']").first # nil

When print to_s or to_xml, so lblock there is with new_children. Where is my mistake?

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.//lblock means find lblock beneath the current node. Maybe a duped doc doesn't have a current node? Have you tried an absolute XPath instead of relative? –  Mark Thomas May 17 '13 at 20:28

1 Answer 1

I can't duplicate the problem:

require 'nokogiri'

new_children = Nokogiri::XML::DocumentFragment.parse('<foo>bar</foo>')
doc = Nokogiri::XML(<<EOF)
<xml>
    <lblock blockName="WINDOW_LIST" />
</xml>
EOF

lblock = doc.xpath(".//lblock[@blockName='WINDOW_LIST']").first
lblock.children = new_children # kind of NodeSet or Node
copy_doc = doc.dup(1) # or dup(0)
lblock = copy_doc.xpath(".//lblock[@blockName='WINDOW_LIST']").first # nil

puts lblock.to_xml
puts
puts doc.to_xml

Running that outputs:

<lblock blockName="WINDOW_LIST">
  <foo>bar</foo>
</lblock>

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<xml>
  <lblock blockName="WINDOW_LIST"><foo>bar</foo></lblock>
</xml>

That said, here's code that is cleaned up to show you some simpler ways to write it:

require 'nokogiri'

new_children = '<foo>bar</foo>'
doc = Nokogiri::XML(<<EOF)
<xml>
  <lblock blockName="WINDOW_LIST" />
</xml>
EOF

lblock = doc.at_xpath('//lblock')
lblock.children = new_children
copy_doc = doc.dup(1)
lblock = copy_doc.at_css('lblock')

puts lblock.to_xml
puts
puts doc.to_xml

Which outputs this too after running:

<lblock blockName="WINDOW_LIST">
  <foo>bar</foo>
</lblock>

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<xml>
  <lblock blockName="WINDOW_LIST"><foo>bar</foo></lblock>
</xml>

Dissecting the code:

lblock = doc.at_xpath('//lblock')
lblock = copy_doc.at_css('lblock')

These use two different ways of finding the same thing. In this case, because the sample XML was simple, I used at, which returns the first matching node. at_xpath and at_css work with XPaths and CSS respectively. at would try to figure out whether the string is CSS or XPath, and normally gets it right, though I have seen it fooled.

lblock.children = new_children

In this case, new_children is a String. Nokogiri is smart enough to know it should convert the string into an XML fragment before using it. This makes it very easy to modify XML or HTML documents with strings, instead of having to create DocumentFragments.

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