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I fixed the code from this question so that it would compile:

#define text ();
#define return &argv;return
int *** emphasized () {
    static int x, *argv = &x, **xpp = &argv;
    puts("\r10 11 11");
    return &xpp;
}
int main (int argc, char *argv[]) {
  int a;
    int n = 10;
    printf("%d",n);
      n++;
    printf("%d",n);
     a = n++;
    printf("%d",n);***emphasized text***
    return 0;
}

In the original question, the asker said:

Output= 10 11 11 why it's not increment value of n in second increment operator

Which is why emphasized() does something funny. I was trying to come up with a way that took the asker's literal code to make it do what he/she said it did. To that end, I treated the ***emphasized text*** as part of the source.

My question is: How would emphasized() be changed so that it renders the 10 11 11 output without calling any output function? I am hoping to observe a way to alter the output rendered by the printf() to standard output to add the spaces but botch the last number.

Since this question is labeled with obfuscation, if the solution involves adding more #defines, have at it.

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1  
what makes you think the increment doesn't happen ? If it's the output, then that's simply because that's what the puts call outputs. –  Sander De Dycker May 17 '13 at 14:53
    
Why did you remove the line #define printf(a,b) (void)0? –  John Bode May 17 '13 at 15:11
    
@JohnBode: Didn't need it to get the observed output. –  jxh May 17 '13 at 15:13
    
@user315052: Yes you did; if you run the program again, you will definitely get different output. –  John Bode May 17 '13 at 15:14
    
@JohnBode: If redirected to a file, but not if observed on the console. –  jxh May 17 '13 at 15:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's the original code:

#define text ();
#define printf(a,b) (void)0
#define return &argv;return
int *** emphasized () {
    static int x, *argv = &x, **xpp = &argv;
    puts("\r10 11 11");
    return &xpp;
}
int main (int argc, char *argv[]) {
  int a;
    int n = 10;
    printf("%d",n);
      n++;
    printf("%d",n);
     a = n++;
    printf("%d",n);***emphasized text***
    return 0;
}

Here's the code after being run through the preprocessor:

int *** emphasized () {
    static int x, *argv = &x, **xpp = &argv;
    puts("\r10 11 11");
    &argv;return &xpp;
}
int main (int argc, char *argv[]) {
  int a;
    int n = 10;
    (void)0;
      n++;
    (void)0;
     a = n++;
    (void)0;***emphasized ();***
    &argv;return 0;
}

Note that the printf statements don't appear in the preprocessed code; the value of n isn't being displayed to the console at all in this version. The output comes from the emphasized function.

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n is incremented to 12 but as n is never printed its value doesn't matter.

Run that crap through the preprocessor and you'll see why.

There is a #define that voids all the printf statements.

The actual output comes from the puts in emphasized.

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n is incremented twice, and it is also printed out, exactly as you'd expect.

But text has been #defined to be a pair of parentheses and a semicolon: ();, and return is replaced with &argv;return

So the code

***emphasized text***
return 0;

becomes:

***emphasized();***
&argv;return 0;

or slightly less oddly formatted:

***emphasized();
***&argv;
return 0;

so the printfs do exactly what it looks like they're going to do, and then emphasized() is called, and it backs up the cursor with a '\r' (carriage return, no line feed) and prints out your 10 11 11.

All the asterisks are just for show, dereferencing pointers but not using the results.

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Here's a slightly less obfuscated version that remaps each printf() call to something that ends up constructing the output as described by the original asker. It is slightly more straightforward since it doesn't define a silly emphasized() function. It also avoids unnecessarily dereferencing argv, to avoid undefined behavior in the case that argc is 0.

This version also has the property that the program will also behave as the asker described if the ***emphasized text*** string is removed from the program.

#include <stdio.h>
#define printf(f,x) printf(x>11?"%d\n":"%d ", x>11?x-1:x);
#define emphasized &argv;
#define text if(0)
#define return &argv;return
int main (int argc, char *argv[]) {
  int a;
    int n = 10;
    printf("%d",n);
      n++;
    printf("%d",n);
     a = n++;
    printf("%d",n);***emphasized text***
    return 0;
}
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