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I have a data.table DT

set.seed(1)
DT <- data.table(x=rep(c(1,2,3),each=4), y=c("A","B"), v=sample(1:100,12))
DT
    x y   v
 1: 1 A  29
 2: 1 B  92
 3: 1 A 100
 4: 1 B  82
 5: 2 A  28
 6: 2 B  26
 7: 2 A  18
 8: 2 B  22
 9: 3 A  30
10: 3 B  96
11: 3 A  15
12: 3 B   4

I would like to expand it like bellow, creating a new column for each value of x and reporting the v values, no structure in the data should be expected (not by blocks like bellow)

    x y v.1  v.2 v.3
 1: 1 A  29   NA  NA
 2: 1 B  92   NA  NA
 3: 1 A 100   NA  NA
 4: 1 B  82   NA  NA
 5: 2 A  NA   28  NA
 6: 2 B  NA   26  NA
 7: 2 A  NA   18  NA
 8: 2 B  NA   22  NA
 9: 3 A  NA   NA  30
10: 3 B  NA   NA  96
11: 3 A  NA   NA  15
12: 3 B  NA   NA   4

I asked a very similar question here but cannot adapt the answer G Grothendieck gave us at the time...

EDIT: As usual I just almost got it after I wrote the post... I just need to replace those 0 by NA (I might get 0 in v and I want to be able to dissociate v==0 from missing items)

DT2 <- DT[, {SUM.<-factor(x); data.table(model.matrix(~ SUM.:v + 0))}]
txtR) DT2
    SUM.1:v SUM.2:v SUM.3:v
 1:      29       0       0
 2:      92       0       0
 3:     100       0       0
 4:      82       0       0
 5:       0      28       0
 6:       0      26       0
 7:       0      18       0
 8:       0      22       0
 9:       0       0      30
10:       0       0      96
11:       0       0      15
12:       0       0       4
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
set.seed(1)
DT <- data.table(x=rep(c(1,2,3),each=4), y=c("A","B"), v=sample(1:100,12))

This gives

    x y  v
 1: 1 A 27
 2: 1 B 37
 3: 1 A 57
 4: 1 B 89
 5: 2 A 20
 6: 2 B 86
 7: 2 A 97
 8: 2 B 62
 9: 3 A 58
10: 3 B  6
11: 3 A 19
12: 3 B 16

Next, the answer:

ux <- unique(DT$x)
DT[,c(v.=lapply(ux,function(i)v[x==i])),by="x,y"]

which gives

    x y v.1 v.2 v.3
 1: 1 A  27  NA  NA
 2: 1 A  57  NA  NA
 3: 1 B  37  NA  NA
 4: 1 B  89  NA  NA
 5: 2 A  NA  20  NA
 6: 2 A  NA  97  NA
 7: 2 B  NA  86  NA
 8: 2 B  NA  62  NA
 9: 3 A  NA  NA  58
10: 3 A  NA  NA  19
11: 3 B  NA  NA   6
12: 3 B  NA  NA  16

That answer might break in later versions of R, but the OP pointed out that this works too and may be faster:

DT[,paste0("v.",ux):=lapply(ux,function(i)v[x==i]),by="x"]
share|improve this answer
    
I think it's sufficient for by=x? –  Arun May 17 '13 at 15:15
1  
Hmm, the desired output has a "y" column anyway. Without putting it in the by, would I have to do something like a merge or DT[,c(list(y=y),v.=lapply(1:3,function(i)v[x==i])),by="x"]? –  Frank May 17 '13 at 15:18
    
@Frank, I think so. Your current answer with by="x,y" won't be identical to OP's requirement. Look carefully at the values you get for your columns and compare with mine.. (except the NA, which I still don't know how to replace while creating model.matrix). –  Arun May 17 '13 at 15:20
    
@statquant Okay, you're right. I've changed it to go over all x values. –  Frank May 17 '13 at 15:22
1  
DT[,paste0("v.",ux):=lapply(ux,function(i)v[x==i]),by="x"] works better (and is probably quicker too) –  statquant May 17 '13 at 15:30
show 4 more comments

Here's one way:

tt <- model.matrix(data=DT, ~ factor(x):rep(1, nrow(DT)) + 0)
tt[tt==0] <- NA
cbind(DT, DT$v * tt)
#     x y   v factor(x)1:v factor(x)2:v factor(x)3:v
#  1: 1 A  69           69           NA           NA
#  2: 1 B  39           39           NA           NA
#  3: 1 A  76           76           NA           NA
#  4: 1 B  49           49           NA           NA
#  5: 2 A 100           NA          100           NA
#  6: 2 B  95           NA           95           NA
#  7: 2 A  36           NA           36           NA
#  8: 2 B  73           NA           73           NA
#  9: 3 A  86           NA           NA           86
# 10: 3 B  20           NA           NA           20
# 11: 3 A  59           NA           NA           59
# 12: 3 B  12           NA           NA           12
share|improve this answer
    
...see my EDIT those 0s are indeed a problem... –  statquant May 17 '13 at 15:13
    
do you see a trick to replace those 0s by NA it's too bad cause it's lightnin' quick... –  statquant May 17 '13 at 15:25
    
@statquant, not straightforward, but I've managed.. check the edit please. –  Arun May 17 '13 at 15:30
    
Nice stuff but I think it's not very efficient though... –  statquant May 17 '13 at 15:58
    
@statquant, You mean efficient in terms of runtime or lines of code (or both)? –  Arun May 17 '13 at 17:05
show 1 more comment

You could simply loop over the x's and use data.table assignment:

setkey(DT, x)
for (i in unique(DT$x)) {
  DT[J(i), paste0("v.", i) := v]
}

P.S. I really wish the following worked, but .GRP is not available there:

DT[, paste0("v.", .GRP) := v, by = x]

edit one more solution (trying to get the above .GRP idea to work somehow), using rbind.fill (I didn't run very careful benches, but this seemed to scale quite well)

library(plyr)

cbind(DT,
      rbind.fill(DT[, list(list(setnames(data.table(v), paste0("v.", .GRP)))),
                      by = x]$V1))
share|improve this answer
2  
+1. Re: the second idea, that sounds like a good feature request, eh? –  Frank May 17 '13 at 15:52
    
If the feature enabling DT[, paste0("v.", .GRP) := v, by = x] were requested it would be nice if it included a facility to specify the fill value in case some other value than NA were desired. –  G. Grothendieck May 17 '13 at 16:54
    
@Frank, I second this. But I think this has been raised sometime before.. iirc. And I think this would be the fastest by far, especially as the columns are already allocated in data.table.. –  Arun May 17 '13 at 17:14
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