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I need to somehow make numpy load in both text and numbers.

I am getting this error:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "ip00ktest.py", line 13, in <module>
    File = np.loadtxt(str(z[1]))        #load spectrum file 
  File "/usr/lib64/python2.6/site-packages/numpy/lib/npyio.py", line 805, in loadtxt
    items = [conv(val) for (conv, val) in zip(converters, vals)]
ValueError: invalid literal for float(): EFF

because my file I'm loading in has text in it. I need each word to be stored in an array index as well as the data below it. How do I do that?

Edit: Sorry for not giving an example. Here is what my file looks like.

FF   3500.  GRAVITY 0.00000  SDSC GRID  [+0.0]   VTURB 2.0 KM/S    L/H 1.25                            
  wl(nm)    Inu(ergs/cm**2/s/hz/ster) for 17 mu in 1221 frequency intervals
            1.000   .900  .800  .700  .600  .500  .400  .300  .250  .200  .150  .125  .100  .075  .050  .025  .010
    9.09 0.000E+00     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
    9.35 0.000E+00     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
    9.61 0.000E+00     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
    9.77 0.000E+00     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
    9.96 0.000E+00     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0

There are thousands of numbers below the ones shown here. Also, there are different datasets within the file such that the header you see on top repeats, followed by a new set of new numbers.

Code that Fails:

import sys
import numpy as np
from math import *

print 'Number of arguments:', len(sys.argv), 'arguments.'
print 'Argument List:', str(sys.argv)

z = np.array(sys.argv)          #store all of the file names into array

i = len(sys.argv)           #the length of the filenames array

File = np.loadtxt(str(z[1]))        #load spectrum file 
share|improve this question
    
you need to give more details about the structure of your file. –  elyase May 17 '13 at 16:21
    
how big is the file? Can you load the whole thing in memory? –  reptilicus May 17 '13 at 16:59
    
I think so. I just tried to use lists, and readlines() doesn't give an error. I assume that means it is not too big? –  user2378781 May 17 '13 at 17:04
    
You could split the file into separate chunk by looking at the lines where the header starts, then load those into numpy to create separate arrays. Or something like that. . . –  reptilicus May 17 '13 at 17:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If the line that messes it up always begins with EFF, then you can ignore that line quite easily:

np.loadtxt(str(z[1]), comments='EFF')

Which will treat any line beginning with 'EFF' as a comment and it will be ignored.

share|improve this answer
    
I really wish I would've seen this earlier. I ended up having to make a counter in the file (since the data sets within were uniform), and having certain arrays reset to 0 after it reached a new "EFF" line. You have just save me a lot of time in the future though. Much appreciated. –  user2378781 May 21 '13 at 20:07

To read the numbers, use the skiprows parameter of numpy.loadtxt to skip the header. Write custom code to read the header, because it seems to have an irregular format.

NumPy is most useful with homogenous numerical data -- don't try to put the strings in there.

share|improve this answer
    
This would be useful, except that the header repeats itself. It'll just screw up once it reaches the header again for a new set of data within the file. –  user2378781 May 17 '13 at 16:53
    
@user2378781 Then read the file line by line, examine the string and decide what to do with each line. –  Janne Karila May 17 '13 at 18:28

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