Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

If I have a template class:

template<typename Layout>
class LayoutHandler : Handler {
};

and I want to expose the parameter Layout to the user of the class. Then:

template<typename Layout>
class LayoutHandler : Handler {
public:
    typedef Layout Layout; // using the same name
};

VS2012 can compile this code, and give the expected result. (I use std::is_same to check it.) Is this allowed in standard C++03 or C++11?

share|improve this question
3  
I'd guess it's allowed but would discourage that though (just doesn't feel good). I'd prefer s.th. like typedef Layout LayoutType; just for readability. – πάντα ῥεῖ May 17 '13 at 16:24
    
Personally I prefer using only one name for one thing. In constructors I also write something like T::T(int a): a(a) {} – jingyu9575 May 17 '13 at 16:50
    
What's the purpose of typedef it with the same name? I dont quite get it. – Marson Mao Aug 7 '14 at 9:02
    
@marson the purpose of the typedef is to make the template parameter type available to code outside of the class. – programmerjake Aug 7 '14 at 10:30
up vote 4 down vote accepted

It is not allowed in C++11.

A typedef is a declaration. (see section 7.1.3)

A template parameter can't be redeclared within its scope (including nested scopes). (see section 14.6.1.6)

C++11 draft standard n3242

share|improve this answer

No till C+11 you can't use it, it gives you an error.

declaration of ‘typedef Layout LayoutHandler::Layout’ error: shadows template parm ‘class Layout’

share|improve this answer
    
So does standard C++11 allow this? – jingyu9575 May 17 '13 at 16:55
    
"Till C++11 you can't use it" I don't think it works for C++11 either (at least for me). – black Aug 7 '14 at 8:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.