Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing a trigger to store the record count of one table as a column in another to speed up some reporting queries on a large db.

Here's what I've got so far, it works fine on deletes but I also need to it work on inserts. Do I need to use a separate trigger? Also, is the use of the cursor necessary or is there a more efficient way?

Thanks!

ALTER TRIGGER [dbo].[updateSourceTotals]
   ON  [dbo].imports
   AFTER INSERT, DELETE
AS 
BEGIN

    SET NOCOUNT ON;

    DECLARE @sourceId int;

    DECLARE deleteCursor CURSOR FOR SELECT DISTINCT sourceId FROM deleted

    OPEN deleteCursor

    FETCH NEXT FROM deleteCursor INTO @sourceId

    WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
    BEGIN

        UPDATE  sources
        SET     totalImports = (
                    SELECT  COUNT(*) 
                    FROM    imports 
                    WHERE   sourceId = @sourceId
                    )
        WHERE   id = @sourceId

    FETCH NEXT FROM deleteCursor INTO @sourceId
    END

    CLOSE deleteCursor
    DEALLOCATE deleteCursor 

END
GO
share|improve this question
3  
Why on earth do you need to keep a count updated via a trigger? You can always get that count at runtime and it doesn't rely on a trigger (with a cursor, no less). If the count is expensive to obtain at select time, then consider an indexed view. This trigger (and the totalImports column) should be dropped. –  Aaron Bertrand May 17 '13 at 16:32
1  
Generally, pre-calculated aggregates are not an advisable way to address reporting performance, especially given their non-relational nature. However, if your reports are written like this trigger, then I can see why they are slow. But still, the solution isn't using a trigger that will make your INSERTs and DELETEs excruciatingly slow. A much more likely solution would be to optimize the reports and their tables and indexes. –  RBarryYoung May 17 '13 at 16:35
    
This is an example, there are much more complex aggregates also used and they want real-time data, so it made sense to me to calculate once when the underlying records were changed, instead of on each request. I'm all ears for other approaches though but it does need to be something persisted rather than calculated at run-time. –  Don't Panic Andy May 17 '13 at 17:10

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you are really set on the Trigger approach (and I do NOT recommend it) then this is a much simpler and probably faster version of your current code:

ALTER TRIGGER [dbo].[updateSourceTotals]
   ON  [dbo].imports
   AFTER INSERT, DELETE
AS 
BEGIN

    UPDATE  s
    SET     totalImports = (
                SELECT  COUNT(*) 
                FROM    imports i
                WHERE   i.sourceId = s.Id
                )
    FROM    sources s
    WHERE   s.id IN(SELECT sourceId FROM deleted)

END

If you want to cover INSERTs also, this should do it:

ALTER TRIGGER [dbo].[updateSourceTotals]
   ON  [dbo].imports
   AFTER INSERT, DELETE
AS 
BEGIN

    UPDATE  s
    SET     totalImports = (
                SELECT  COUNT(*) 
                FROM    imports i
                WHERE   i.sourceId = s.id
                )
    FROM    sources s
    WHERE   s.id IN(
                    SELECT sourceId FROM deleted
                UNION
                    SELECT sourceId FROM inserted
                  )

END

As an added bonus, it should work for UPDATEs as well.


Just to clarify, the problem with doing pre-aggregation in a Trigger, even after you eliminate the Cursor, is that instead of re-calculating the query on each request, you are instead re-calculating them on each modification.

Even in the abstract, this is only a win if you do many such requests, but do not modify the table very much. However, in the real context of an active DBMS server, you lose most of even this small advantage too, because if you are making many such requests, then they are probably getting cached very effectively (in turn, because reads are much more cache-effective than writes).

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work - if I run a simple UPDATE sources SET label = label to update all rows, it does calculate totalImports but the numbers are all wrong. I think for an update it has to work per row (or at least, per sourceId)? –  Don't Panic Andy May 17 '13 at 17:14
    
This does calculate it per sourceid, it just does it in a set-oriented manner. As for the problem with UPDATE's, I know of no reason why this should not work correctly. Can you post some example data to demonstrate or at least explain how it's wrong? –  RBarryYoung May 17 '13 at 17:23
    
I've found the issue. It works fine ON UPDATE for any sources that have imports, but if the result of the COUNT() FROM imports is zero, then it returns the total number of records in the table, regardless of the sourceId. SELECT id, totalImports, (SELECT COUNT() FROM imports WHERE imports.sourceId = sources.id) AS actualImports FROM sources 6 136037 0 7 136037 0 8 136037 0 9 136037 0 10 136037 0 11 1873 1873 12 82 82 13 278 278 14 2762 2762 15 4509 4509 –  Don't Panic Andy May 17 '13 at 17:57
    
Sorry for formatting, still trying to figure out SO, please bear with me! –  Don't Panic Andy May 17 '13 at 17:59
    
@Don'tPanicAndy Post stuff like this by editing your original post and adding it at the end. –  RBarryYoung May 17 '13 at 18:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.