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I have an application where the user is inputting a user name and the application is returning the user ID from a database query.

The problem I am having is how do I display the userID in the userIDLbl?

The code looks like so:

JButton currentRoleBtn = new JButton("Get ID");
    currentRoleBtn.setBounds(50, 50, 150, 30);
    currentRoleBtn.setToolTipText("Press to get the ID for the user");
    currentRoleBtn.addActionListener(new ActionListener()
    {
        public void actionPerformed (ActionEvent e)
        {
            int userID;
            String userName = adUserNameTxt.getText().toString();
            StringBuffer getRolesQuery1 = new StringBuffer("select id from hib.person where name = '");
            getRolesQuery1.append(userName).append("'");
            try 
            {
                ResultSet rs = stmt.executeQuery(getRolesQuery1.toString());
                try
                {
                    while (rs.next())
                    {
                        userID = rs.getInt(1);
                        System.out.println("The User ID is: " +userID);

                    }
                }
                finally
                {
                    rs.close();
                }
            } 

            catch (SQLException e1) 
            {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e1.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    });

    //Create UserID label
    JLabel userIDLbl = new JLabel("User ID is: " +userID);
    userIDLbl.setFont(new Font("Georgia", Font.PLAIN, 14));
    userIDLbl.setForeground(new Color(50,50, 25));
    userIDLbl.setBounds(25, 200, 200, 30);
share|improve this question
6  
You have a SQL injection vulnerability. –  SLaks May 17 '13 at 16:29
    
Why can't you just move the code inside as well? –  James Montagne May 17 '13 at 16:29
    
What's keeping this from working? It seems as though this would be fine, if you're ok with userID being the last userID in the ResultSet, that is. –  SubSevn May 17 '13 at 16:30
    
@SubSevn there will only be one result. –  DarthOpto May 17 '13 at 16:43
1  
Then you can just set userID at the class level and you can set the label in the try/catch, or after the try catch. –  SubSevn May 17 '13 at 16:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Declare userID as a class level variable.

so you can use it anywhere else you'll have to make it final to access it outside the try catch block but then you won't be able to change the value of this variable.

class User  
{  
   private int userID;  

//Constructors
 public void actionPerformed (ActionEvent e)
        {  

   }
}    
share|improve this answer

Variables are local to their respective code blocks. If you want to use them outside a try-catch, either define them outside the block and then work with them inside, or, as the comments have indicated, move more of the code inside the try block.

Edit: Or better yet, as the other two answers have stated, make it a class member.

share|improve this answer

Make it a class member variable.

class Foo  
{  
   private int userID;  
...
//getters setters
 public void actionPerformed (ActionEvent e)
        {  
          ...
   }
}       

NEVER DO THIS

 StringBuffer getRolesQuery1 = new StringBuffer("select id from hib.person where name = '");
            getRolesQuery1.append(userName).append("'");

You cannot trust user input. You want something like this to help mitigate SQL injection:

PreparedStatement statement = conn.prepareStatement("select id from hib.person where name = ?");  
statement.setString(1,userName);
share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much –  DarthOpto May 17 '13 at 18:27

In general, if you declare a variable inside a {} scope, the variable is inaccessible outside that scope. This is true for a C, C++, Java, and a number of other languages.

In Java, if you declare the variable outside of the scope, set it only in a conditional scope (which may be "conditional" due to an if or due to try/catch), and then attempt to reference that variable after you leave that conditional scope, the compiler and verifier will complain that the variable is not initialized.

SomeClass someVar;
try {
    someVar = someValue;
    someOtherStuff;
    ...
}
catch ... {
    ...
}
someOtherVar = someVar;  // This access IS NOT allowed, because "someVar" is not certain to be initialized if an exception occurs.

So, in general, your solution is:

SomeClass someVar = null;  // Or some other appropriate default value
try {
    someVar = someValue;
    someOtherStuff;
    ...
}
catch ... {
    ...
}
someOtherVar = someVar;  // This access IS allowed, because someVar is initialized, at least to "null".

(Note that this says nothing about whether your use of try/catch was appropriate, or whether errors are properly handled -- that is a separate question.)

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