Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

This question already has an answer here:

I've got a question about overriding methods. OK, we've got an OOP here, I can understand what result I'll got. But.. How does the jdk resolve, what implementation to use in each case?

public class One {
    One() {
        run();
    }

    public void run() {
        System.out.println("One");
    }
}

public class Two extends One {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        System.out.println("Two");
    }
}

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
       One test = new Two();
    }
}

I'm really sorry for not very good code listing, I was in a hurry. Changes added.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by NINCOMPOOP, Tom Seidel, syb0rg, madth3, Tim Bish May 17 '13 at 22:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
It's very unclear what level of detail you're talking about. Do you mean at the JIT-compiled code level? – Jon Skeet May 17 '13 at 16:41
2  
public class One() that's not how you declare a class, and you don't override static methods. – Bhesh Gurung May 17 '13 at 16:46
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Java is going to look up the function in the vtable for Two. If it's not found, it'll look in the vtable for One. In this case, it's found (and directly noted with @Override), so it's used.

http://stackoverflow.com/a/1543311/431415

Basically, it's going to go from most specific to least specific, looking for a function that matches.

share|improve this answer
    
The answer from Theodoros is more complete than this one. – SubSevn May 17 '13 at 16:52
    
In fact, this is what I was looking for, thank you. Can you tell me more about vtables in Java or something? – katsanva May 17 '13 at 22:04
    
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_dispatch and stackoverflow.com/questions/6606481/… The concept is similar between C++/Java, but in Java all your methods will be virtual unless declared with final. – SubSevn May 20 '13 at 10:50

First of all the way the classes have been declared is wrong and also static menthods do not take part in overriding, because static methods are not bound to objects.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.