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So in my database, I have two tables which have a many to one relationship. I am trying to update the 'parent' table by looking at all the rows on the 'child' table (sorry if I'm not using the correct terminology here) and applying different sets of rules to the data to determine the values to update with. But I want to do this efficiently (which is to say, quickly).

So, assume the following tables.

PARENT(
    ID                                 NUMBER,
    NAME                               VARCHAR(20),
    NUMBER_OF_CHILDREN                 NUMBER,
    AVERAGE_CHILD_AGE                  NUMBER,
    OLDEST_CHILD_AGE                   NUMBER,
    YOUNGEST_CHILD_AGE                 NUMBER,
    MODE_EYE_COLOR                     VARCHAR(20),
    EVERY_CHILD_MADE_A                 VARCHAR(1),
    BLOODTYPES_THAT_CAN_BE_ACCEPTED    VARCHAR(100),
    SOMETHING_COMPLEX                  COMPLEX_OBJECT_1
)

CHILD(
    ID                   NUMBER,
    PARENT_ID            NUMBER,
    AGE                  NUMBER,
    EYE_COLOR            VARCHAR(20),
    MADE_AN_A            VARCHAR(1),
    BLOODTYPE            VARCHAR(5),
    COMPLEXITY           COMPLEX_OBJECT_2
)

I've used simplified examples, the actual rules that need to be applied are a decent bit more complicated that min/max/average. Now, these are the two ways I'm thinking this can be done. The first is to just have the procedure pass the parent ID on to functions (I use separate functions so later going back and maintaining this code is easier) and each one selects the children and then processes them. The second way is to open a cursor that selects the children and then pass the cursor into each function.

PROCEDURE UPDATE_PARENT_1 (PARENT_ID IN NUMBER)
BEGIN
    UPDATE PARENT
    SET
        NUMBER_OF_CHILDREN                = CHILD_COUNT_FUNCTION(PARENT_ID),
        AVERAGE_CHILD_AGE                 = CHILD_AGE_AVERAGE_FUNCTION(PARENT_ID),
        OLDER_CHILD_AGE                   = PICK_OLDEST_AGE_FUNCTION(PARENT_ID),
        YOUNGEST_CHILD_AGE                = PICK_YOUNGEST_AGE_FUNCTION(PARENT_ID),
        MODE_EYE_COLOR                    = MOST_OFTEN_EYE_COLOR_FUNCTION(PARENT_ID),
        BLOODTYPES_THAT_CAN_BE_ACCEPTED   = DETERMINE_BLOOD_DONOR_TYPES(PARENT_ID),
        SOMETHING_COMPLEX                 = COMPLEX_FUNCTION(PARENT_ID)
    WHERE
        ID = PARENT_ID;
END;


PROCEDURE UPDATE_PARENT_2 (PARENT_ID IN NUMBER)
    CURSOR C IS SELECT * FROM CHILD WHERE CHILD.PARENT_ID = PARENT_ID
BEGIN
    OPEN C;

    UPDATE PARENT
    SET
        NUMBER_OF_CHILDREN                = CHILD_COUNT_FUNCTION(C),
        AVERAGE_CHILD_AGE                 = CHILD_AGE_AVERAGE_FUNCTION(C),
        OLDER_CHILD_AGE                   = PICK_OLDEST_AGE_FUNCTION(C),
        YOUNGEST_CHILD_AGE                = PICK_YOUNGEST_AGE_FUNCTION(C),
        MODE_EYE_COLOR                    = MOST_OFTEN_EYE_COLOR_FUNCTION(C)
        BLOODTYPES_THAT_CAN_BE_ACCEPTED   = DETERMINE_BLOOD_DONOR_TYPES(C),
        SOMETHING_COMPLEX                 = COMPLEX_FUNCTION(C)
    WHERE
        ID = PARENT_ID;

    CLOSE C;
END;

With either way, I feel like things I'm doing extra work. The first way feels the worse, because it appears I'm doing far too many select statements (1 for each rule I have to apply, and there are many). The second way I only need to go back to the front of the cursor instead of doing another select, but it still feels as if there should be a more efficient way. At the same time, oracle has great behind the scenes optimization, so either way may be being optimized to the best way to do it behind the scenes.

So my question is what is the quickest way to do this sort of update, or can I not worry about optimizing it and oracle will take care of it for me?

EDIT: Made the example a bit more complex.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use various STATS_* functions in addition to the more standard MIN(), MAX() etc. If these still aren't enough you can create user defined aggregate functions. (sample SQL taken from another answer)

UPDATE Parent
SET (Number_Of_Children, Average_Child_Age, Oldest_Child_Age,
     Youngest_Child_Age, MODE_EYE_COLOR, BLOODTYPES_THAT_CAN_BE_ACCEPTED,
     SOMETHING_COMPLEX ) = 
(
  SELECT COUNT(*), AVG(Age), MAX(Age), MIN(Age), STATS_MODE(EYE_COLOR),
    ListBloodTypes(BLOODTYPE), ComplexCombine(SOMETHING_COMPLEX)
  FROM Child
  WHERE Parent.ID = Child.Parent_ID
)

Your user defined aggregate functions ListBloodTypes and ComplexCombine would then need to be defined with: Using User-Defined Aggregate Functions as a guide.

share|improve this answer
    
So would creating one's own aggregate function reduce/eliminate any overhead resulting from context switching? –  Lawtonfogle May 20 '13 at 16:16
    
From what I've read, it appears that user defined aggregate functions are likely the best source. It also appears to avoid context switching problems as long as you don't do SQL in the functions themselves, but I've still haven't found a definite answer. –  Lawtonfogle May 21 '13 at 13:44
    
As long as you don't make calls that cause a context switch in your code. For complex statistical functions it can be beneficial to make those calls however. An example would to pass the calculations to the open source statistical environment R. –  Brian May 21 '13 at 15:11

You can do everything but the mode of the eye color like this:

UPDATE Parent
SET (Number_Of_Children, Average_Child_Age, Oldest_Child_Age, Youngest_Child_Age) = (
  SELECT COUNT(*), AVG(Age), MAX(Age), MIN(Age)
  FROM Child
  WHERE Parent.ID = Child.Parent_ID
)

I couldn't think of a way to fit the mode in there. It's a tough calculation in general in SQL, and I don't think it lends itself to storage in a column because of these scenarios:

  • Three children, each with a different eye color: that's either no mode or three modes (one for each eye color) depending on who you ask - and some will answer "both".
  • Three children, two with green eyes: OK, green is the mode here, no problem.
  • Four children, two with brown eyes and two with blue eyes: brown and blue are both modes.

I hope this helps; it could be that your efforts to simplify the question, while excellent, sent me on a wrong path :) Let me know.

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The trouble here is that the business rules being used are more complex than just averages. As for the mode example, assume the functions have some defined way to handle this (perhaps it replies 'multiple'. –  Lawtonfogle May 17 '13 at 17:50
    
Oh well, I feared as much. The main point was that you can update from a subquery if you do UPDATE (col_1, ..., col_n) SELECT (n values). You could also look into pipelined functions to return all of the values at once. They're a bit involved but not as complicated as they seem at first glance. Once you have the function (and its associated types) in place the UPDATE command is UPDATE table SET (col_1, ..., col_n) = (SELECT TABLE(pipelined_function(parameters))). That said, if your current approach is acceptable you can just stick with that :) –  Ed Gibbs May 17 '13 at 17:58
    
I'm not sure how pipeline functions would help much except for the procedure now calling a pipelined function and the pipelined function calling all the little functions (which I assume is even worse efficiency than what I have). –  Lawtonfogle May 17 '13 at 18:07
    
Absolutely correct - a pipelined function will only help if the values can be calculated more or less side-by-side in the same function. If it can't be done that way then the way you're already doing it is probably the most efficient and definitely the most readable. –  Ed Gibbs May 17 '13 at 18:10
    
The actual computations aren't pretty. For example, one function will look at all the values in one column and depending upon if certain values appears, return one of 32 different possible answers. Still not sure if passing the cursor or doing the multiple selects are better. Might have to wait for test data, try both ways, and time doing it a few hundred times to see which is quicker. –  Lawtonfogle May 17 '13 at 18:18

First, I am shamelessly borrowing from Ed Gibb's answer. My only addition is to show how to get the mode.

To do this, I am using analytic functions instead of aggregation. Most of the new columns are the same, just with an over (partition by parent_id) clause. The innermost subquery also includes the count of the number of children with a given eye color. The next level of subquery orders by that value, and the outermost chooses one of the rows -- which will have the mode.

UPDATE Parent
    SET (Number_Of_Children, Average_Child_Age, Oldest_Child_Age, Youngest_Child_Age
         Mode_Eye_Color) =
         (select cnt, avg_age, min_age, max_age, eyecolor 
          from (select cnt, avg_age, min_age, max_age, eyecolor
                       ROW_NUMBER() over (order by cnt_ec desc) as seqnum
                from (select COUNT(*) over (partition by Parent_id) as cnt,
                             AVG(Age) over (partition by Parent_id) as avg_age,
                             MIN(Age) over (partition by Parent_id) as min_age,
                             MAX(Age) over (partition by Parent_id) as max_age,
                             COUNT(*) over (partition by Parent_id, eyecolor) as cnt_ec,
                             eyecolor
                      from Child
                      where Parent.ID = Child.Parent_ID
                     ) t
               ) t
          where seqnum = 1
         )
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Gordon and no worries. I tried the analytical path myself but kept getting lost. Normally I'm fine with these so I think I'm already slipping into weekend mode :) –  Ed Gibbs May 17 '13 at 18:00
    
Wouldn't this update all parent rows? –  Lawtonfogle May 17 '13 at 18:13
    
@Lawtonfogle . . . The innermost subquery is correlated to the outer one. So, all parent rows would be updated, with the appropriate information about their children. –  Gordon Linoff May 17 '13 at 18:16
    
I'm assuming that it is pretty simple to tie this to only update select rows (we don't want to update everything, only the parents of any children who change), but even then, this appears to quickly grow complicated (and less maintainable) as you add more rules that need to be enforced. –  Lawtonfogle May 17 '13 at 18:22
    
In that case, you can add a where clause or change update parent to be an updatable subquery that appropriately filters the rows. –  Gordon Linoff May 17 '13 at 18:26

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