Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

my code hit a performance snag that I could reproduce in this snippet

rm (z)
z = c()
system.time({z[as.character(1:10^5)] = T})
user  system elapsed 
48.716   0.023  48.738 

I tried to pre-allocate z with

z = logical(10^5)

but it makes no difference. Then I pre-allocated names with

names(z) = character(10^5)

Still no speed difference.

system.time({z[as.character(1:10^5)] = T})
user  system elapsed 
50.345   0.035  50.381 

If I repeat the test, with or without pre-allocations, speed is back to reasonable levels (more than 100X faster).

system.time({z[as.character(1:10^5)] = T})
user  system elapsed 
0.037   0.001   0.039 

Finally I found a not-quite-workaround:

names(z) = as.character(1:10^5)
system.time({z[as.character(1:10^5)] = T})
user  system elapsed 
0.035   0.001   0.035 

To go back to the slow time, you can rm(z) and initialize it in a different way, but even changing names back to something else flips the time back to slow. I am saying this is not quite a workaround because I don't understand why it works so it's hard to generalize to the actual use case where I don't know the names in advance. Of course given the two orders of magnitude difference, one suspects that some non-vectorized or interpreter-heavy operation is involved, but you can see my code is loop free and doesn't invoke any interpreted code that I can think of. Then trying with smaller vectors, I saw that the execution time grows much faster than linear, maybe quadratic, which points to something else. The question is what is the reason for this speed behavior and what is the solution to make it faster.

Platform is OS X mt lion with R 15.2. Thanks

Antonio

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This seems quite fun. It does seem that R is extending the vector one element at a time for each unmatched name. Here we (a) choose only the last value, in case names are duplicated and then (b) update existing named elements and (c) append new elements

updateNamed <-
    function(z, z1)
{
    z1 <- z1[!duplicated(names(z1), fromLast=TRUE)] # last value of any dup
    idx <- names(z1) %in% names(z)                  # existing names...
    z[ names(z1)[idx] ] <- z1[idx]                  # ...updated
    c(z, z1[!idx])                                  # new names appended
}

Which works like this

> z <- setNames(logical(2), c("a", 2))
> updateNamed(z, setNames(c(TRUE, FALSE, TRUE, FALSE), c("a", 2, 2, "c")))
    a     2     c
 TRUE  TRUE FALSE   

and is faster

> n <- 3*10^4
> z <- logical(n)
> z1 <- setNames(rep(TRUE, n), as.character(1:n))
> system.time(updateNamed(z, z1))
   user  system elapsed
  0.036   0.000   0.037

It's worth thinking carefully about how names are being used, e.g., appending to a previously unnamed vector

> length(updateNamed(z, z1))
[1] 60000

while updating (with the 'last' value) a named vector

> length(updateNamed(z1, !z1))
[1] 30000

and also that as mentioned on ?"[<-" that zero-length strings "" are not matched.

> z = TRUE; z[""] = FALSE; z

 TRUE FALSE
share|improve this answer
    
I didn't go find out the source code involved, but additional experiments support this interpretation. Luckily I found a different approach that doesn't require named vectors. –  piccolbo May 21 '13 at 16:43

I can speculate what is going on, since the timings below seem to go along my assumption.

Here are the three relevant runs:

# run 1 - slow
rm (z)
n <- 3*10^4
z <- vector("logical", n)
system.time({
z[as.character(1:n)] <- T
})
#    user  system elapsed 
#    5.08    0.00    5.10

# run 2 - fast
rm (z)
n <- 3*10^4
z <- vector("logical", n)
system.time({
names(z) <- as.character(1:n)
z[as.character(1:n)] <- T
})
#    user  system elapsed 
#    0.03    0.00    0.03 

# run 3 - slow again
rm (z)
n <- 3*10^4
z <- vector("logical", n)
system.time({
for (i in 1:n) names(z)[i] <- as.character(i)
z[as.character(1:n)] <- T
})
#    user  system elapsed 
#    6.10    0.00    6.09 

Run #3 is what I think is happening in the background, or at least something to that effect: While doing the assignment by name, R is looking for the names one at a time and if no found, assigning it at the end of the names vector. Doing this one at a time is what is killing it...


You also pointed out that pre-assigning the names as follows names(z) <- character(1:n) was not helping. Hehe, see that character(1:n) returns "" so it is not setting the names like you thought. No surprise it is not helping much. You meant to use as.character instead of character.


Finally, you ask what is the solution to make this faster? I'd say you have already found one (Run#2). You can also do:

keys   <- as.character(1:n)
values <- rep(T, n)
z <- setNames(values, keys)
share|improve this answer
    
Yup. I just got to the same place. Should have been obvious, really, from just looking at the lengths. Specifically, x <- 1:5; x['a'] <- 6 extends x. –  joran May 17 '13 at 18:37
    
So why do you think I asked the question if #2 is a solution? –  piccolbo May 17 '13 at 19:04

To fix this problem (generically) you can decouple naming from assignment:

z[1:10^5] = T
names(z) = as.character(1:10^5)

But I don't really know why the slowdown happens (it sounds like the full as.character is called for every element of z in your expressions, but that's just a guess).

share|improve this answer

Can't quite point my finger on it, but I suspect simplifying an example might help explain something:

R> z = logical(6); z[1:3] = T; z[as.character(1:3)] = T; z
                                        1     2     3
 TRUE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE

and furthermore while z[1:5] could be direct, presumably vectorized, lookups z[as.character(1:5)] would be involving name to index lookup, failing that falling back to item-at-a-time append, and so on.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.