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[DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError=true)]
    public static extern unsafe bool WriteFile(IntPtr hFile, void* lpBuffer, uint nNumberOfBytesToWrite, out uint lpNumberOfBytesWritten, IntPtr lpOverlapped);

I am implementing this through a Write(..) method with a signature:

Write(IntPtr handleFile, void* bufferData, uint length){
    void* buffer = bufferData
    while (length > 0)
    {
      uint wrtn;
      if (!WriteFile(handle, buffer, len, out wrtn, IntPtr.Zero))
      {
         // Do some error handling
      }
      // THIS DOESNT WORK!
      // I want to move along the buffer to be able to write its remainder...
      // I tried many variations of this as well, but it seems even '+' is not valid  for a void*
      buffer += wrtn;
      len -= wrtn;
    }
}

As I learned by looking at this (the use of the read counterpart is discussed) I need to implement a while loop in my code because the write/read of the buffer might not go through in one go. This is where the problem start:

If I want to keep my C# method signature as to accept a void*, unlike the linked Read example where a byte* is accepted as a parameter for the buffer.

This means that after one pass of the WriteFile, I should move my void* along to the start of the buffer that has not been written yet. I cannot apparently do this by just incrementing void* with the uint that holds the number of bytes written... I understand that void* does not have a predetermined size and that incrementing is therefore not possible but I wonder how I then should achieve what I am trying to do.

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3  
Is there is any reason for you to use the Win32 api unsafe code when you could use what is provided with the System.IO namespace? –  Pierre-Alain Vigeant Nov 2 '09 at 14:23
    
Yes, expanding my knowledge of native stuff/interop and understanding the stuff that .net usually hides from us. I was never taught what I call "fundamental" stuff (pointers, ...) and I very much would like to learn. –  Kris Nov 2 '09 at 14:32
    
@Kris: If you wanna learn about Pointers and Low-Level stuff, I'd use a Low-Level Language (C, C++, (QT, wxWidgets)), and not try to take a High- to a Low-level language. –  Bobby Nov 2 '09 at 14:49
    
..unless he wants to learn about pointers and memory management internals in the context of .net. I think exercises like this are useful even if only to point out why you shouldn't do something like this in production code. –  Mike Dinescu Nov 2 '09 at 15:31
    
You might not want to do this exact thing in production code but there are things about .NET that I don't like: the omission of up-to-date file open/save dialogs such as the ones exposed by IFileDialog are just one example. Trying to get things like that in your high level language projects (where the high level language is suitable for 99,9% of the things you might want to do) requires knowledge of stuff like this... –  Kris Nov 2 '09 at 17:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should be able to cast buffer to a byte* and then increment it. A void pointer doesn't have size associated with it so if you want to move it a certain number of bytes in any direction you can cast it to a different type of pointer (any type for that matter) and then use the casted type's size in the pointer arithmetic, like so:

buffer = (void *)((byte*)buffer + wrtn);

The line above casts buffer to a byte pointer, then increments its position by wrtn number of bytes and then casts the new pointer back to a void*. Of course, casting to a byte* is the obvious choice if you are wanting to perform arbitrary pointer arithmetic.

Another possibility is to treat buffer as a byte* all along and only cast it to void* when you pass it to WriteFile

Write(IntPtr handleFile, void* bufferData, uint length)
{
    byte* buffer = (byte*)bufferData;
    while (length > 0)
    {
      uint wrtn;
      if (!WriteFile(handle, (void*)buffer, len, out wrtn, IntPtr.Zero))
      {
         // Do some error handling
      }
      buffer += wrtn;
      len -= wrtn;
    }
}

And, as a last suggestion, I would consider changing the signature of Write altogether to use a byte* instead of void* because it would make it more compatible with other callers from C# and a byte* makes more sense in that case. You shouldn't have to worry about making it match the signature of the WriteFile native API since you can cast the byte* as shown above to a void* when passing it in.

Write(IntPtr handleFile, byte* bufferData, uint length)
{
    while (length > 0)
    {
      uint wrtn;
      if (!WriteFile(handle, (void*)bufferData, len, out wrtn, IntPtr.Zero))
      {
         // Do some error handling
      }
      bufferData+= wrtn;
      len -= wrtn;
    }
}

Alas, I have to agree with one of the commenters. Why are you doing this? There are better ways to accomplish a file write in c# using many of the stream oriented classes.

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I think I can work with your answer. Of course it is easier to just use pre-cooked API stuff and I probably will do so eventually, but every now and then I like to learn new things. I have always had a strong urge to really understand things and not just use "black boxes" all the time. Every now and then I google some code online, or I look at an assembly to see how things are done by "the pros" and then I try to implement my own version. This was one of those things... –  Kris Nov 2 '09 at 14:39
    
Then I hope my explanation helps you understand things better @Kris. But please make sure you read more about pointers and the .NET managed memory model before you release any code that performs pointer operation from C#. It can lead to many nasty problems if not done right! –  Mike Dinescu Nov 2 '09 at 14:44
    
Continuing on this: I tried your suggestion and it works. One thing I don't get is the code the compiler spits out... something like buffer = buffer + wrtn; where buffer is of type byte* and wrtn is uint gets compiled to buffer += (byte*)wrtn; (.NET reflector). This last line, however, will never compile. How can this be so? And knowing this, how might something like bufferv += (void*) wrtn; (as output by reflector) originally have been coded (knowing void* arithmetic is apparently not possible... –  Kris Nov 2 '09 at 14:48
    
@Kris, that is certainly an interesting question in itself and while I don't know the answer maybe you should post it as a separate question with a link to this one. I'm sure there is an explanation out there.. –  Mike Dinescu Nov 2 '09 at 15:28

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