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contest_entry_spec.rb

    require 'spec_helper'

    describe ContestEntry do

      before(:all) do
        @admission=Factory(:project_admission)
        @project=Factory(:project_started, :project_type => @admission.project_type)
        @creative=Factory(:approved_creative, :creative_category => @admission.creative_category)
        @contest_entry=Factory(:contest_entry, :design_file_name => 'bla bla bla', :owner => @creative, :project => @project)
      end

      context 'non-specific tests' do
        subject { @contest_entry }
        it { should belong_to(:owner).class_name('User') }
        it { should belong_to(:project) }
        it { should have_many(:entry_comments) }

        it { should validate_presence_of(:owner) }
        it { should validate_presence_of(:project) }
        it { should validate_presence_of(:entry_no) }
        it { should validate_presence_of(:title) }

      end
end

When I run these tests everything is okey but if I change before(:all) to before(:each) every test will be failed.I don't know why it happens?

This is the error

 Failure/Error: @contest_entry=Factory(:contest_entry, :design_file_name => 'bla bla bla', :owner => @creative, :project => @project)
     ActiveRecord::RecordInvalid:
       Validation Failed: User is not allowed for this type of project
share|improve this question
up vote 71 down vote accepted

before(:all) runs the block one time before all of the examples are run.

before(:each) runs the block one time before each of your specs in the file

before(:all) sets the instance variables @admission, @project, @creative, @contest_entry one time before all of the it blocks are run.

However, :before(:each) resets the instance variables in the before block every time an it block is run.

Its a subtle distinction but important

again,

before(:all)
#before block is run
it { should belong_to(:owner).class_name('User') }
it { should belong_to(:project) }
it { should have_many(:entry_comments) }

it { should validate_presence_of(:owner) }
it { should validate_presence_of(:project) }
it { should validate_presence_of(:entry_no) }
it { should validate_presence_of(:title) }

before(:each)
# before block
it { should belong_to(:owner).class_name('User') }
# before block
it { should belong_to(:project) }
# before block
it { should have_many(:entry_comments) }
# before block

# before block
it { should validate_presence_of(:owner) }
# before block
it { should validate_presence_of(:project) }
# before block
it { should validate_presence_of(:entry_no) }
# before block
it { should validate_presence_of(:title) }
share|improve this answer
    
Let me know if you question on anything. glad to help – fontno May 17 '13 at 23:01

Before(:all), which ensures that the sample users are created once, before all the tests in the block. This is an optimization for speed.

share|improve this answer

One of the most important details of before :all is that it's not DB transactional. Ie, anything within the before :all persists to the db. This is not mentioned in the other answers so thought i'd clarify.

Implications mean that after test suites have completed, changes are not reverted ready for next tests.

This can result in complicated bugs and issues with cross contamination of data between tests. Documentation detail also seems sparse on this issue.

A quick test to demonstrate:

1. Truncate your appropriate DB table then try this,

  before :all do
    @user = Fabricate(:user, name: 'Happy Fun Pants')
  end

2. Observe database afterwards, you will notice the model remains persisted!?

3. now try this,

  before :each do
    @user = Fabricate(:user, name: 'Happy Fun Pants')
  end

4. The database remains devoid of data after the test suite is complete. Needless to say, a more ideal outcome especially if your working with continuous integration and expect your tests begin at a consistent state.

To be clear, the problem start arising when you have a test fails amongst 100's. The database will be left in some unknown state. When the tests kick off again, things are uncertain to run as expected. Your test db should always start in a consistent state.

So, IMO this is a feature in need of your clear understanding. In short, before :each, is probably what you want. NB: your tests will run slightly slower, but worth it

Detail here: https://relishapp.com/rspec/rspec-rails/docs/transactions

Hope that helps another weary traveller.

share|improve this answer

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