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I have a large dataframe made up of both factor and numeric variables (numeric variables contain NA's). I would like to find the number of observations of multiple numeric variables for different levels of one of the factor variables. Instead of treating each numeric variable separately, I am trying to use the aggregate function with either dot notation or cbind to denote the numeric variables I would like grouped and counted using length(). However, when I do this aggregate gives the same number of observations for each variable, which I know is wrong. Is there something about aggregate and length that doesn't work for multiple variables?

Here is a simple example that illustrates the problem... var1 should have n=3 in all groups, which it does when I treat it on it's own, but with dot notation or cbind it just assumes the n values of var2.

    df <- data.frame(group=c("a","b","c","a","b","c","a","b","c"), var1=1:9, var2=c(1,2,3,NA,5,6,7,8,9))
    aggregate(var1 ~ group, df, length) 
    aggregate(var2 ~ group, df, length) 
    aggregate(. ~ group, df, length)
    aggregate(cbind(var1,var2) ~ group, df, length)
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2 Answers 2

Perhaps this helps:

df <- data.frame(group=c("a","b","c","a","b","c","a","b","c"),
                 var1=1:9, var2=c(1,2,3,NA,5,6,7,8,9))

with(df, length(cbind(var1, var2)))

> with(df, length(cbind(var1, var2)))
[1] 18

length() treats cbind(var1, var2) as a matrix, which is just a vector with dimensions, hence you get the length reported as prod(nrow(mat), ncol(mat)) where mat is the resulting matrix.

Ideally you'd use nrow() instead of length(), but perhaps more widely applicable is the NROW() function, which will treat a vector as a 1-column matrix for purposes of evaluating the function. nrow() won't work for a vector input

> nrow(1:10)
NULL

E.g. try these:

aggregate(cbind(var1,var2) ~ group, df, NROW)
aggregate(var1 ~ group, df, NROW)

> aggregate(cbind(var1,var2) ~ group, df, NROW)
  group var1 var2
1     a    2    2
2     b    3    3
3     c    3    3
> aggregate(var1 ~ group, df, NROW)
  group var1
1     a    3
2     b    3
3     c    3

and as you have NA, you probably don't want the incomplete cases removed, which would happen by default. This is seen above and hence why the number of rows for group a is 2. For that add na.action = na.pass to the call:

aggregate(cbind(var1,var2) ~ group, df, NROW, na.action = na.pass)

> aggregate(cbind(var1,var2) ~ group, df, NROW, na.action = na.pass)
  group var1 var2
1     a    3    3
2     b    3    3
3     c    3    3

The issues is that in building up the data frame to pass to aggregate.data.frame, the usual model frame generation process takes place and aggregate.formula has the na.action argument set to na.omit by default - which is standard behaviour in modelling functions that use formula interfaces.

If you want to count the number of non-NA values per variable then you need a completely different approach, perhaps using is.na(), as in

foo <- function(x) sum(!is.na(x))
aggregate(cbind(var1,var2) ~ group, df, foo, na.action = na.pass)

> aggregate(cbind(var1,var2) ~ group, df, foo, na.action = na.pass)
  group var1 var2
1     a    3    2
2     b    3    3
3     c    3    3

Which works by counting the number of non-NA values through coercion of first TRUE -> FALSE via ! and then resulting TRUEs are converted to 1 and FALSEs to 0, which sum() then adds for us.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Gavin! Thanks for the explanation. I don't want the NAs included in my counting or for any of my other functions (min, max, mean, etc) for that matter. I see that 'foo' works, but don't understand why you use 'sum'. Shouldn't that add up all the non-NAs? –  CJO May 17 '13 at 20:55
    
Sorry, I just saw your text below the code. Ok, I understand how this works. However, I also want to use aggregate with cbind or dot notation to apply other functions to my groupings (e.g. min, max, mean, sd). Just adding in na.action=na.pass doesn't work. Any advice? Btw... this is Claire from the course you gave at Mac! –  CJO May 17 '13 at 21:04
    
@CJO Hi Claire! Those functions you list all have an na.rm argument which will ignore any NA whilst doing the computation instead of returning NA. You pass additional arguments to functions via the ... argument. Hence aggregate(cbind(var1,var2) ~ group, df, mean, na.action = na.pass, na.rm = TRUE) will work. Just switch out mean and replace with the other functions you mentioned. –  Gavin Simpson May 17 '13 at 21:27
    
Awesome! Thank you Gavin! It's really amazing how long one can spend trying to figure this out. –  CJO May 21 '13 at 17:16

Is this what you were looking for?

aggregate(
    cbind(var1,var2) ~ group,
    df,
    function(x)sum(!is.na(x)),
    na.action=na.pass
)

which gives

  group var1 var2
1     a    3    2
2     b    3    3
3     c    3    3

The default behavior of aggregate is to drop rows with any NAs from computation. The option na.action=na.pass tells aggregate to include those rows.

We have to change the function from length to something that will count only non-NA entries of each var. !is.na(x) calculates a TRUE-FALSE/1-0 vector, which sums to the number of non-NAs. Alternately, length(x[!is.na(x)]) should give the same result.

A similar problem arises with other functions. In statistics, I guess you generally want to drop entire observations (which is what rows usually are associated with) with missing values, not just parts of them. Anyway, here's another example, using a new data frame,

df2 <- rbind(df,list("c",NA,10))
aggregate(
    cbind(var1,var2) ~ group,
    df2,
    max
)
#   group var1 var2
# 1     a    7    7
# 2     b    8    8
# 3     c    9    9

That gave the wrong answer, and here's the analogous change:

aggregate(
    cbind(var1,var2) ~ group,
    df2,
    max, na.rm = TRUE,
    na.action=na.pass
)
#   group var1 var2
# 1     a    7    7
# 2     b    8    8
# 3     c    9   10

If you look at the ?max documentation, you'll see that it has an na.rm option that does what we want here. And in the ?aggregate documentation, it says we can pass additional named arguments to our function in the way seen here. Thanks to @GavinSimpson for pointing this out.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, thank you. What does the exclamation mark represent? Also, I am now realizing I am having the same problem for other functions (min, max, mean, sd, etc). What is the root of the problem? The NA's? –  CJO May 17 '13 at 20:39
    
Ok, '!' indicates logical negation, but why does 'sum' work and not 'length'? And if we're already telling R to not include the NA's with the '!', why do we also need to write 'na.action=na.pass'? –  CJO May 17 '13 at 20:47
    
@CJO I've added an explanation. For other functions, you'll have to look at their documentation to see how to deal with NAs. I think a lot of those have na.rm as an option. –  Frank May 17 '13 at 20:55
1  
@Frank The additional complication of max(x[!is.na(x)]) is not required as it has an na.rm argument as most of these functions do. –  Gavin Simpson May 17 '13 at 21:29
    
@GavinSimpson Ah, I thought I'd tried that, but you're right. Thanks. –  Frank May 17 '13 at 21:32

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