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I have a string, s, with a length of 2*2*1092-1 = 4367 characters. Here are the first 15 characters:

0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0

I am interested in the characters as couples; i.e. for the first 15 characters:

00, 01, 01, 00

My string only contains 0 and 1 and the possible couples are thus:

00, 01, 10 and 11

I want to get an unordered list of all the couples present in my string; i.e. for the first 15 characters:

00 and 01

What is the fastest way to do this in Python? Below are 3 methods (Python 3):

def method1(s):
    l_couples = [s[4*i:4*i+3] for i in range(1092)]
    set_couples = set(l_couples)

def method2(s):
    set_couples = []
    for i in range(1092):
        couple = s[4*i:4*i+3]
        if not couple in set_couples:
            set_couples += [couple]

def method3(s):
    set_couples = set()
    for i in range(1092):
        couple = s[4*i:4*i+3]
        set_couples |= set([couple])

I looped over each method 10k times and got these run times:

method1: 3.94s

method2: 5.64s

method3: 10.7s

Here is the entire string consisting of 4367 characters:

0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Thank you.

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Isn't 10 a possible couple? –  Rushy Panchal May 17 '13 at 21:17
    
Yup, I forgot to add it. Fixed. Not sure if it will ever appear for the actual data though, but that should have no influence on the question. –  tommy.carstensen May 17 '13 at 21:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Only optimize on such a low level if you really need to!

There is no reason why you should micro-optimize for such a small input amount of data. A string of ~4000 characters is nearly nothing.

Donald Knuth: "We should forget about small efficiencies, say about 97% of the time: premature optimization is the root of all evil"

So in this case the most readable and comprehensable solution would be the best.

But to be constructive, here is my proposal:

def method5(s):
    return {s[x:x+3] for x in xrange(0, len(s), 4)}

%timeit method5(s)
10000 loops, best of 3: 123 us per loop

and here the method by another user:

def method4(s):
    return {s[4*i:4*i + 3] for i in range(len(s) / 4)}

%timeit method4(s)
10000 loops, best of 3: 176 us per loop

and the benchmarks for the other methods:

%timeit method1(s)
10000 loops, best of 3: 184 us per loop

%timeit method2(s)
10000 loops, best of 3: 185 us per loop

%timeit method3(s)
1000 loops, best of 3: 513 us per loop
share|improve this answer
    
xrange should be range in Python 3. Also, include your benchmarks for the other methods. –  Blender May 17 '13 at 21:48
    
The other method where posted in an answer by another user, but was deleted just a few moments ago. I will change my post and include the other methods again (but I can't give credit, because I can't remember his name). –  michaelkrisper May 17 '13 at 21:54
    
I just tested the previous method, which was just removed. It returns 00 instead of 00 and 01. - I need the optimization, because I have millions of strings and sometimes with more than 4000 characters. - I haven't tagged the question with python3, so just leave the xrange in there. –  tommy.carstensen May 17 '13 at 21:56
    
@michaelkrisper: There's no need to include my method. Using range's step argument is faster and looks nicer anyways. –  Blender May 17 '13 at 22:03
    
@tommy.carstensen: Where are you getting this input from? –  Blender May 17 '13 at 22:03

Instead of brute force indexing through the string like it was an array, learn about Python's features like split, and iter, and zip:

def uniqueCouples(s):
    # get all the characters in a list, splitting on whitespace
    items = source.split()

    # create an iterator over this list
    it = iter(items)

    # using zip(it,it) will create a sequence of tuples, taking the generated list
    # in pairs; then use ''.join() to merge the tuples into couples; then find the 
    # set of unique pairs
    return set(''.join(couple) for couple in zip(it,it))

EDIT: adding performance numbers

To normalize out differences in hardware, I ran @michaelkrisper's method5 on my system, and got 189 us (note also that method5 returns '0 1' and '0 0', not '01' and '00' as requested).

Testing the above solution as posted gives a time of about 370 us. Then I realized that I was calling ''.join on every zipped tuple, instead of just on the reduced number of items after the set removed all the duplicates - who cares now if join is slow, we're only going to call it a couple of times. Changing the return statement to:

    return [''.join(cpl) for cpl in set(zip(it,it))]

cuts the time to 209 us.

So maybe split() is slowing us down, so I'll change to using islice, creating a slicing iterator to walk through the input source string (of course this is now a bit more fragile, as any deviation in the input source format, like an extra space between values, will break our code, whereas using split, while a little slower, is more robust). Changed to:

from itertools import islice
def uniqueCouples(s):
    it = islice(s, 0, None, 2)
    return [''.join(cpl) for cpl in set(zip(it,it))]

And the time now drops to 197 us. Changing the list comprehension to use map(''.join, set(zip(it,it))) drops us down to about 194 us.

So I'm not sure where you get your information that split and join are slow - the big inefficiency I had in my submission was that I was calling join before using set to remove the duplicates.

share|improve this answer
    
I know split and join are quite slow. How fast is your method compared to the ones already provided? –  tommy.carstensen May 19 '13 at 9:54
    
Yes, I meant running split and join across all items in your iterator would be slow. I like your use of iter and your post-EDIT solution. Thanks. –  tommy.carstensen May 19 '13 at 17:04

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