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Context: On our website, we calculate whether an item/order meets the criteria for free shipping using an if statement evaluating if a value - 'ff' - is true. Depending on conditions met it sets the shipping appropriately. We now require the need to evaluate if an item is free shipping with the order of _. To top it off, for other purposes such as external feeds, another condition must apply (weight must = 0 or have no value), for fw to be free freight. Here is the code, that I can't figure out why it is NOT working:

if($r['freeFreight'] == 'ff' || ($r['freeFreight'] == 'fw' && ($r['weight'] == 0 || $r['weight'] == '') ) ) {
    $r['shippingStandard'] = 0;
}

Are the conditions overly segregated in the if statement with the sets of ()? Or, are they just incorrectly placed. For example, should it be:

if(($r['freeFreight'] == 'ff') || ($r['freeFreight'] == 'fw' && $r['weight'] == 0 || $r['weight'] == '') ) {
    $r['shippingStandard'] = 0;                     
}

The second of the two seems more logical to me because: if ($r['freeFreight'] == 'ff') - then regardless of the following conditions the statement should return true and set the variable to 0. Is my logic correct? Sorry for this newb question...

Thanks for any help you can offer.


So I think perhaps, based on the answers so far (thanks everybody that has chimed in to help an amateur) - I think I am going to do a trial with:

if( ($r['freeFreight'] == 'ff') || ( $r['freeFreight'] == 'fw' ) && empty( $r['weight'] ) ) { 
    $r['shippingStandard'] = 0;
}

Planning to run trial with this, if it is fundamentally wrong, please advise.

share|improve this question
    
Are you checking isset($r['weight']) ? –  klugerama May 17 '13 at 21:22
    
I'm not.. smh - so would it than be if(($r['freeFreight'] == 'ff') || (isset($r['weight'] && $r['freeFreight'] == 'fw' && $r['weight'] == 0 || $r['weight'] == '') ) { $r['shippingStandard'] = 0; } –  James Lee May 17 '13 at 21:26
    
emtpy would be cleaner than doing all those checks –  Ascherer May 17 '13 at 21:29
    
That looks OK to me. –  klugerama May 17 '13 at 21:29
2  
try to never rely on a language's operator precedence rules if you can at all help it, and especially if you're working with multiple languages. it may be a bit more tedious, but always use proper bracketing to enforce "your" rules, instead of hoping the language parsing will do it properly for you. –  Marc B May 17 '13 at 21:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this out?

if( $r['freeFreight'] == 'ff' || ( $r[ 'freeFreight' ] == 'fw' && empty( $r['weight'] ) ) ) {
    $r['shippingStandard'] = 0;
}

using empty might be a little cleaner too

if you really want to break it out more, you could do this

if( $r[ 'freeFreight' ] == 'ff' ) {
    $r[ 'shippingStandard' ] = 0;
} elseif( $r[ 'freeFreight' ] == 'fw' && empty( $r[ 'weight' ] ) ) {
    $r[ 'shippingStandard' ] = 0;
} else {
    // Everything else
}

If you want to shorten the variables, and will be using them later:

$freight  = $r[ 'freeFreight' ];
$weight   = isset( $r[ 'weight' ] ) ? $r[ 'weight' ] : null;
$shipping = $r[ 'shippingStandard' ]; // Or whatever you want the default value to be...
if( $freight == 'ff' || ( $freight == 'fw' && empty( $weight ) ) ) {
    $shipping = 0;
}

// ... Later down the file
$r = array( 
    'freeFreight' => $freight,
    'weight' => $weight, 
    'shippingStandard' => $shipping
);

I really cant tell how the rest of the file looks, like if this is in a function to get shipping, you could simply just return $shipping. Hope this helps. You should be able to move the concepts around to get what you want

share|improve this answer
    
if im reading the requirements wrong, just let me know –  Ascherer May 17 '13 at 21:26
    
The problem is, if $r['freeFreight'] == 'ff' we don't care whether $r['weight'] = null, '', 0, or 9081239082. Should this just be done with an if else statement? –  James Lee May 17 '13 at 21:34
    
I think this is I'm going to give the empty a shot, but bracket off the first condition. It may be exactly what we're looking for. –  James Lee May 17 '13 at 21:40
    
yeah, i fixed that so it was what you wanted. You could clean it up more, by assigning $r['freeFreight'] to $freight, so it fits better on the line, idk if you will use that variable later in the function –  Ascherer May 17 '13 at 21:47
2  
@JamesLee try leaving comments rather than editing the answer, these will just be rejected as invalid, attempt to comment or reply" –  Deanna May 17 '13 at 22:34

your first option should should be identical to the following:

if ($r['freeFreight'] == 'ff') {
    $r['shippingStandard'] = 0;
}
elseif ($r['freeFreight'] == 'fw') {
    // the dual check for an empty value here is kind of redundant and unneccessary.
    // I'd probably just use "if ($r['weight'])" and be done with it
    if ($r['weight'] == 0) {
        $r['shippingStandard'] = 0;
    }
    elseif ($r['weight'] == '') {
        $r['shippingStandard'] = 0;
    }
    else {
        // $r['shippingStandard'] stays whatever it was before
    }
}
else {
    // $r['shippingStandard'] stays whatever it was before
}

if that logic looks right to you, then you should be right on and I'd print_r($r) to make sure it's holding what you expect it to be holding. Your parenthesis in the first example is exactly how I would do it.

share|improve this answer
    
if( $r[ 'weight' ] ) is a very lazy check, and doesn't leave much to saying what you are checking for. PLEASE use something like empty to say exactly what you are looking for. Just because PHP lets you hang yourself with code, it doesn't mean you should. if( empty( $r[ 'weight' ] ) ) checks for null, set, 0, and '' –  Ascherer May 17 '13 at 21:55
    
@Ascherer Awesome! I was not aware empty checked for 0, that's great! I can knock off the last part of my if statement I just added to my OP. –  James Lee May 17 '13 at 22:07
    
Normally I'm on the "explicit intentions" bandwagon, and I might come around on empty() eventually, but all it does is evaluate to true when the supplied variable implicitly evaluates to false... I try to eliminate cruft where I can, and I haven't gotten over the crufty feeling of empty(). What it does do is allow me not to care about the existence of the variable, which I feel I either should know, or check more explicitly with isset(). At any rate, just know it's a style choice I've thus far made on purpose. –  Jason May 18 '13 at 0:04

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