Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So here I was merrily going about my day and I come to find that the method I have been using to retrieve a computers IP address had hit a snag:

return _ipAddress = Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName()).AddressList.FirstOrDefault(ip => ip.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork && !IPAddress.IsLoopback(ip));

I knew there was the potential for problems as not all networks will implement a proper DNS solution. So I have been searching and looking for alternatives and have settled on the following:

    return NetworkInterface.GetIsNetworkAvailable()
    // If a network connection is available (marked as up and is not a loopback or tunnel interface), 
    // try to return the IPAddress object associated with the network connection.
    ? NetworkInterface.GetAllNetworkInterfaces()
        // Filter to include only the network interfaces that are up; it can transmit data packets.
        .Where(network => network.OperationalStatus == OperationalStatus.Up)
        // Filter to include only the network interfaces that support Internet Protocol version 4.
        .Where(network => network.Supports(NetworkInterfaceComponent.IPv4))
        // Filter to exclude unknown network interfaces.
        .Where(network => network.NetworkInterfaceType != NetworkInterfaceType.Unknown)
        // Filter to exclude loopback network interfaces.
        .Where(network => network.NetworkInterfaceType != NetworkInterfaceType.Loopback)
        // Retrieve the properties of any adapters that meet the filter requirements.
        .Select(network => network.GetIPProperties())
            // Filter to exclude network adapters that have no gateway address assigned to them.
            .Where(ipProps => ipProps.GatewayAddresses.All(gateway => gateway.Address != new IPAddress(0)))
            // Retrieve the unicast addresses of any network adapters that meet the filter requirements.
            .Select(ipProps => ipProps.UnicastAddresses
                // Filter to exclude unicast addresses that do not have an IPv4 Subnet mask.
                .Where(unicast => unicast.IPv4Mask != null)
                // Filter to exclude unicast addresses that are not valid and unrestricted.
                .Where(unicast => unicast.DuplicateAddressDetectionState == DuplicateAddressDetectionState.Preferred)
                // Filter to exclude virtual netork addresses.
                .Where(unicast => unicast.AddressPreferredLifetime != UInt32.MaxValue)
                // Retrieve the IPAddress from the network interface.
                .Select(unicast => unicast.Address)
                    // Filter to exclude addresses that are not IPv4 Addresses.
                    .Where(ip => ip.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork)
            // Retrieve the first value.  If no values match, the method returns the default value for an IPAddress object (null).
            .FirstOrDefault())
        // Retrieve the first value.  If no values match, the method returns the default value for an IPAddress object (null).
        .FirstOrDefault()
    // If a network connection is not available, we will return a null value.
    : null;

I would like to know if I am looking at a potential problem child or if this is an efficient method to accomplish this task.

Thanks,

-Richard

share|improve this question
    
its ok. but you can use a WMI query to find the local ipaddresses. –  pylover May 18 '13 at 0:16
    
    
I had already searched stackoverflow. I saw the one mention previously as well as this one stackoverflow.com/questions/9855230/…. This one however, matches closer with what I finally arrived at: stackoverflow.com/questions/1069103/…. My question is not so much about how to do it. My question is more to do with any potential pitfalls. How would you handle multiple NICs that are listed as up and using a valid ipv4 scheme. –  Saige45 May 18 '13 at 3:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.