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The following recursive algorithm is a (fairly inefficient) way to compute n choose k:

 int combinationsOf(int n, int k) {
     if (k == 0) return 1;
     if (n == 0) return 0;
     return combinationsOf(n - 1, k) + combinationsOf(n - 1, k - 1);
}

It is based on the following recursive insight:

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Actually evaluating this function takes a LOT of function calls. For example, computing 2 choose 2 this way makes these calls:

 combinationsOf(2, 2)
   |  |
   |  +- combinationsOf(1, 2)
   |       |  |
   |       |  +- combinationsOf(0, 2)
   |       |
   |       +-- combinationsOf(1, 1)
   |             |  |
   |             |  +- combinationsOf(0, 1)
   |             |
   |             +- combinationsOf(1, 0)
   +- combinationsOf(2, 1)
        |  |
        |  +- combinationsOf(2, 0)
        |
        +- combinationsOf(1, 1)
             |  |
             |  +- combinationsOf(0, 1)
             |
             +- combinationsOf(1, 0)

There are many ways to improve the runtime of this function - we could use dynamic programming, use the closed-form formula nCk = n! / (k! (n - k)!), etc. However, I am curious just how inefficient this particular algorithm is.

What is the big-O time complexity of this function, as a function of n and k?

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1  
Shouldn't you be returning combinationsOf(n - 1, k - 1) + combinationsOf(n - 1, k)? –  Blender May 17 '13 at 23:28
    
@Blender- Oh, whoops! Yes, fixed. :-) –  templatetypedef May 17 '13 at 23:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Let C(n,k) be the cost of computing binom(n,k) in that way, with

C(0,_) = 1
C(_,0) = 1

as base cases.

The recurrence is obviously

C(n,k) = 1 + C(n-1,k-1) + C(n-1,k)

if we take addition to have cost 1. Then, we can easily check that

             k
C(n,k) = 2 * ∑ binom(n,j) - 1
            j=0

by induction.

So for k >= n, the cost is 2^(n+1) - 1, C(n,n-1) = 2^(n+1)- 3, C(n,1) = 2*n+1, C(n,2) = n*(n+1)+1, (and beyond that, I don't see neat formulae).

We have the obvious upper bound of

C(n,k) < 2^(n+1)

independent of k, and for k < n/2 we can coarsely estimate

C(n,k) <= 2*(k+1)*binom(n,k)

which gives a much smaller bound for small k, so overall

C(n,k) ∈ O(min{(k+1)*binom(n,min(k, n/2)), 2^n})

(need to clamp the k for the minimum, since binom(n,k) decreases back to 1 for k > n/2).

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Perhaps I am missing something, but how does that formula simplify to 2^{n+1} - 1 if k >= n? If k >= n, the binomial theorem says that the sum reduces to 2^n, so we'd get back 1 + 2(2^n) = 1 + 2^{n+1}. How does the sign flip? –  templatetypedef May 18 '13 at 19:30
1  
The sum starts from 1, not from 0. I think I should have better written 2*∑ binom(n,j) - 1 and let the sum start from 0. –  Daniel Fischer May 18 '13 at 19:42
    
Very nifty! One question - where on earth did this come from? I worked through the induction and it checked out, but I have no idea how I would have come up with this on my own. –  templatetypedef May 19 '13 at 22:04
    
I just made a small table (n, k <= 6) and looked at the differences in each row. That cleared it up nicely. (I also looked at the differences in the columns, but those were not so helpful.) –  Daniel Fischer May 19 '13 at 22:13
O(2^n)

When n<k you stop the recursion by hitting n=0 after n steps. In each level of recursion you call two functions, so this is where the number 2 came from. If n>k then the recursion in the "right branch" is stopped by hitting k=0 which is fewer steps then hitting n=0, but overall complexity is still 2^n.

But the real problem is the recursion itself - you will hit stack limit really soon.

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