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I have a GregorianCalendar that I am am trying to set the time on. I am getting the date from one calendar and the time from another calendar. It mostly works, except for the 2AM hour of the DST switch day.

For example, with a date of 3/10/2013, a time of 2:40AM and a target output of 3/10/2013 2:40AM, I get 3/10/2013 3:40AM:

GregorianCalendar reportingDate = //some instance with a relevant date (in this case 3/10/2013)
GregorianCalendar targetTime = //some instance with a relevant time (in this case 2:40AM)
Calendar combination = Calendar.getInstance();
combination.set(Calendar.YEAR, reportingDate.get(Calendar.YEAR));
combination.set(Calendar.MONTH, reportingDate.get(Calendar.MONTH));
combination.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_YEAR, reportingDate.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_YEAR));
combination.set(Calendar.HOUR, targetTime.get(Calendar.HOUR));
combination.set(Calendar.AM_PM, targetTime.get(Calendar.AM_PM));
combination.set(Calendar.MINUTE, targetTime.get(Calendar.MINUTE));
combination.set(Calendar.SECOND, targetTime.get(Calendar.SECOND));

As soon as the code sets the AM_PM on the combination Calendar the time switches to 3:40AM. I would like it to not switch. I think this has to do with the target time Calendar being created as a time on the epoch date, but I would like the target time's specific date to not really matter...

share|improve this question
    
I faced a similar problem and this is because the time zone of your PC doesn't support the 2:00 a.m. on the date when applies the change from standard time to daylight saving time (DST), e.g. (UTC-06:00) Central Time (US & Canada). I even tried using joda library without success (maybe I didn't put enough effort). I would like to get an answer on this topic too. – Luiggi Mendoza May 17 '13 at 23:54
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Based on this output... I would think this is just how Java deals with DST? Seems like 2-3 AM goes into oblivion

See my comment below

final Calendar reportingDate = Calendar.getInstance();
reportingDate.set(Calendar.YEAR, 2013);
reportingDate.set(Calendar.MONTH, Calendar.MARCH);
reportingDate.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, 10);

final Calendar targetTime = Calendar.getInstance();
targetTime.set(Calendar.AM_PM, Calendar.AM);
targetTime.set(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY, 3);
targetTime.set(Calendar.MINUTE, 0);
targetTime.set(Calendar.SECOND, 0);
targetTime.set(Calendar.MILLISECOND, 0);

final Calendar combination = Calendar.getInstance();
combination.set(Calendar.YEAR, reportingDate.get(Calendar.YEAR));
combination.set(Calendar.MONTH, reportingDate.get(Calendar.MONTH));
combination.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_YEAR, reportingDate.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_YEAR));
combination.set(Calendar.HOUR, targetTime.get(Calendar.HOUR));
combination.set(Calendar.AM_PM, targetTime.get(Calendar.AM_PM));
combination.set(Calendar.MINUTE, targetTime.get(Calendar.MINUTE));
combination.set(Calendar.SECOND, targetTime.get(Calendar.SECOND));
combination.set(Calendar.MILLISECOND, targetTime.get(Calendar.MILLISECOND));

final long timeAtCombined = combination.getTimeInMillis();

final SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("MM/dd/yyyy HH:mm:ss.SSSZ");
sdf.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("US/Eastern"));

// subtract one minute
System.out.println(sdf.format(combination.getTime()));
combination.add(Calendar.MILLISECOND, -1);
System.out.println(sdf.format(combination.getTime()));

// millis @ 3
System.out.println(sdf.format(new Date(timeAtCombined)));
// millis @ 3 - 1ms
System.out.println(sdf.format(new Date(timeAtCombined - 1)));

Output

03/10/2013 03:00:00.000-0400
03/10/2013 01:59:59.999-0500
03/10/2013 03:00:00.000-0400
03/10/2013 01:59:59.999-0500
share|improve this answer
1  
Actually, I just noticed where "oblivion" is.. of course, the offset changes at that time. Java considers the offset to change from 0400 to 0500 at 2-3 AM (this is for EST), so no time is lost, but you cannot represent 3/10/2013 2AM EST with a 0400 offset, because it doesnt exist – Alex May 18 '13 at 0:29

You're setting everything, except for the time zone (which contains the DST). Set that as well, and you should be okay.

share|improve this answer
    
That won't solve the problem. Have you at least tried it? – Luiggi Mendoza May 17 '13 at 23:54
    
It is what was the solution when I was faced with a similar problem. I am very sorry. – Jan Doerrenhaus May 18 '13 at 0:16
1  
It is not a solution because when you use combination.getTime() it will return a new Date object with the pc/server time zone applied, so the time zone change made on the calendar won't have any effect. – Luiggi Mendoza May 18 '13 at 0:19
    
+1 Good to know. – Jan Doerrenhaus May 18 '13 at 0:22

This isn't really an answer to your question directly but you can avoid all of this craziness by going with Joda Time

They have really nailed the date/time/calendar thing down.

share|improve this answer
    
If you post an example, it would be great. – Luiggi Mendoza May 17 '13 at 23:56

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