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I have a std::vector. I check its size which is 6 but when I try to access vec[6] to check whether it will give error, I get no error but some number instead. Should not it give an error?

edit: something like:

struct Element
{
    std::vector<double> face;
};

Element *elm;
elm = new Element[n];
...
std::cout << elm[0].face.size() << std::endl; // answer is 6
std::cout << elm[0].face[6] << std::endl; // answer is some number
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size 6, so last is vec[5] starts with 0 –  Bill May 18 '13 at 2:56
    
Not sure where you got the idea that vector would throw an error on an invalid index using operator[]. The docs certainly say otherwise. –  Ed S. May 18 '13 at 2:57
    
Notice that the first element has a position of 0 (not 1). -- cplusplus.com/reference/vector/vector/operator[] –  Bill May 18 '13 at 2:58
    
@Bill: I think they understand that indexes start at zero and that 6 is out of range, but they're wondering why accessing something out of range does not yield an error. –  icktoofay May 18 '13 at 2:59
1  
@Koushik: Because it slows things down. That's what at() is for –  Ed S. May 18 '13 at 3:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

STL vectors perform bounds checking when the .at() member function is called, but do not perform any checks on the [] operator.

When out of bounds, the [] operator produces undefined results.

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The behavior is undefined, so implementations are allowed to introduce bounds checks; the difference from at is that bounds checks are required for at. –  Pete Becker May 18 '13 at 15:46

It's undefined behavior. Undefined behavior does not necessarily mean you'll get an error: you might, but you might instead get some result that doesn't make much sense.

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Data structures are indexed starting at 0, so if you are accessing vec[6] then this is going to be out of bounds. You are likely not getting an error due to a memory issue; there could be something there from previous code you have run, or some similar error. Please post code.

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