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I am using properties to allow a single string name to be added to the class Details, I want the property to only accept the string if it can be split into two parts.

The two parts would be the firstName and the LastName. However if the resulting split has 1,0 or more than 2 strings in the array then the input should be deemed invalid and I want to throw a error to whatever code called the property in the first place.

Can error handling be done on properties like this?

If not then what of the following is the preferred way to get data into a class whilst checking for correctness:

  1. Use a method inside the class Details to handle error inputs, make that method boolean.
  2. Continue using properties but have the error checking done by the code that calls the property. I don't like this because I want all the error checking code to be self-contained in the Details class.

.

class Details
{
    private string firstName, lastName;

    public string Name
    {
        // name
        get { return firstName + " " + lastName; }
        set 
        { 
            string name = value;
            string[] nameArray = name.Split(' ');
            firstName = nameArray[0];
            lastName = nameArray[1];
        }
    }
}

EDIT: I am mostly interested in what of the three options is concidered best pratice:

  1. Error check inside properties.
  2. Error check outside class in another class, and then just add the verified inputs to Details
  3. Use a boolean method inside Details to verify the inputs.
share|improve this question
    
you can check the length of array inside the property. –  Rajasekar Gunasekaran May 18 '13 at 3:21
    
@RajasekarGunasekaran, Is that good coding though? It seems from a few answers below that it is not a good idea to do any checking inside a property. –  Joseph May 18 '13 at 3:36
    
@Joseph There's nothing wrong with validating input inside a property setter. In fact, it's a very common, even standard, practice. –  Jeremy Todd May 18 '13 at 3:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just to add my perspective to what others have said, it seems to me that part of the difficulty stems from the fact that you're using a property setter to do something non-trivial (split a string, validate the results, and then store the results in two fields). Generally, properties, especially read/write properties, should only be concerned with getting and setting a single value (using read-only properties to return a simple computed value is common enough too).

If it were me, I'd have separate properties for the first name and last name, with a third computed property for the full name:

class Details
{
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }

    public string FullName
    {
      get { return string.Concat(this.FirstName, " ", this.LastName); }
    }
}

Then you could add a method to set the full name. A method is more appropriate than a property setter for this task, since it's non-trivial and has more potential for problems:

public void SetFullName(string fullName)
{
  string[] nameComponents = fullName.split(' ');

  if (nameComponents.Length != 2) 
  {
    throw new ArgumentException("The full name must contain a first and last name.");
  }

  this.FirstName = nameComponents[0];
  this.LastName = nameComponents[1];
}

I also want to give a plug for the Code Contracts package. It may be more complication than you're looking for here, but it's a great way of validating input and output in your applications.

share|improve this answer

I would follow an existing validation framework, such as FluentValidation.

Also, in your specific case, I would have a SetName(string fullName) method that does the parsing and populating.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, so properties shouldn't really be used for parsing and validating data? This is not considered good coding? –  Joseph May 18 '13 at 3:32
    
I consider properties as simple passthrough with minimal functionality. You should feel safe to databind to properties and not have performance concerns. –  Mike Cole May 18 '13 at 3:34
    
Thanks Mike. This makes sense now and does clear things up. From what you have said and also Jetti, validating inside a property is not a good idea. –  Joseph May 18 '13 at 3:38

Why not use exception to capture the error condition.

    private string firstName, lastName;
    public string Name
    {
        get { return string.Concat(firstName, " ", lastName); }
        set
        {
            string name = value;
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(name)) { throw new ArgumentNullException("Name"); }

            var nameParts = name.Trim().Split(' ');
            if (nameParts.Length != 2) { throw new ArgumentException("Invalid name value"); }

            firstName = nameParts[0];
            lastName = nameParts[1];
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

So I wouldn't consider data that doesn't meet business logic an exception and thus wouldn't throw one. What I would do is this:

class Details
{
    private string firstName, lastName;

    public string Name
    {
        // name
        get { return firstName + " " + lastName; }
        set 
        { 
            string name = value;
            string[] nameArray = name.Split(' ');
            if(nameArray.Length == 2) 
            {
                firstName = nameArray[0];
                lastName = nameArray[1];
            } 
            else
            {
                firstName = nameArray[0]; 
                lastName = string.Empty;
            }
        }
    }

    public bool IsValid()
    {
         return !string.IsNullOrEmpty(lastName);
    }
}

You can then use the name property and then check to see if the name is valid. If not valid, then you can take the appropriate action.

Another option would be to have the validation done in the method calling Details.Name.

EDIT: want to remove what I think is bad advice but keeping so comments make sense, so just striking them out

EDIT2:

You could also do something like this:

class Details { private string firstName, lastName;

    public string Name
    {

        get { return firstName + " " + lastName; }
        private set;
    }

    public bool TryParseName(string name)
    {
        bool isValid = true;
        string[] nameParts = name.split(' ');
        if(nameParts.Length == 2) 
        {
             firstName = nameParts[0];
             lastName = nameParts[1];
        }
        else
        {
             isValid = false;
        }

        return isValid;
    }
}

Where you would do

if(details.TryParseName(name))
{
    // is valid name
}
else
{
    // handle invalid name
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jetti, If I have the validation done in the method calling Details.Name that method could easily reside inside Details. Is that correct? This way the entire class is self contained. –  Joseph May 18 '13 at 3:31
    
@Joseph I have modified my answer. I don't think that verifying outside the class would be a good idea. You could, however, create another method that would take a string and then double check to ensure it is properly formatted and then have it return bool. I'll add an example –  Jetti May 18 '13 at 3:35
    
@Jetti Why do you consider invalid input not to be an exceptional condition? Seems like a typical ArgumentException scenario to me. –  Jeremy Todd May 18 '13 at 3:48
    
@JeremyTodd I understand some would use an `ArgumentException' but it is something that can be handle quite easily by using if statements. To me, it isn't exceptional behavior if it is expected to happen. –  Jetti May 18 '13 at 4:01
    
@Jetti See, I feel the opposite way. I wouldn't consider input that would cause normal execution of the method body to fail and/or put the object into an invalid state to be expected behavior. It can be handled by if statements, sure, but those if statements should be executed by the caller to make sure the input is valid before invoking the setter. –  Jeremy Todd May 18 '13 at 4:08

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