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Can someone please correct this code of mine for FizzBuzz!, there seems to be a small mistake, this code prints all the numbers, instead of printing only numbers that are not divisible by 3 or 5.

/Write a program that prints the numbers from 1 to 100. But for multiples of three print “Fizz” instead of the number and for the multiples of five print “Buzz”. For numbers which are multiples of both three and five print “FizzBuzz”/

/*Write a program that prints the numbers from 1 to 100. But for multiples of three print “Fizz” instead of the number and for the multiples of five print “Buzz”. For numbers which are multiples of both three and five print “FizzBuzz”*/

function isDivisible(numa,num)
   {if (numa%num==0)
   {
       return true;
   }
   else
   {
       return false;
   }};


function by3 (num)
{
    if(isDivisible(num,3))
    {
        console.log("Fizz");
    }
    else{
    return false;}
};

function by5 (num)
{
    if(isDivisible(num,5))
    {
        console.log("Buzz");
    }
    else {
        return false;
    }
};


for (var a=1;a<=100;a++)
{
    if(by3(a))
    {
        by3(a);
        if(by5(a))
        {
            by5(a);
            console.log("\n");
        }
        else
        {
            console.log("\n");
        }
    }
    else if (by5(a))
    {
        by5(a);
        console.log("\n");
    }
    else
    {
        console.log(a+"\n")
    }




}
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1  
i % 5 == 0 doesn't need to be turned into a function. Step back for a second and ask yourself, "how would I do this by hand?" –  Blender May 18 '13 at 4:29
    
This is a common problem.. see c2.com/cgi/wiki?FizzBuzzTest –  sachleen May 18 '13 at 4:30
    
yep that function was uncalled for @blender –  pacmanfordinner May 18 '13 at 4:39
    
Here's a hint: What do by3 and by5 return when they print Fizz or Buzz? –  Barmar May 18 '13 at 4:39
    
oh i think it is always giving false! @barmar –  pacmanfordinner May 18 '13 at 4:52

9 Answers 9

up vote 1 down vote accepted
/*Write a program that prints the numbers from 1 to 100. But for multiples of three print “Fizz” instead of the number and for the multiples of five print “Buzz”. For numbers which are multiples of both three and five print “FizzBuzz”*/

var str="",x,y,a;
for (a=1;a<=100;a++)
{
    x = a%3 ==0;
    y = a%5 ==0;
    if(x)
    {
        str+="fizz"
    }
    if (y)
    {
        str+="buzz"
    }
    if (!(x||y))
    {
        str+=a;
    }
    str+="\n"
}
console.log(str);

Your functions return falsy values no matter what, but will print anyway. No need to make this overly complicated.

fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/ben336/7c9KN/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Totally helped. –  pacmanfordinner May 18 '13 at 5:10
for (var i = 1; i <= 100; i++) {
    var expletive = '';
    if (i % 3 === 0) expletive += 'Fizz';
    if (i % 5 === 0) expletive += 'Buzz';
    console.log(expletive || i);
}
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1  
I really like the solution you've provided for this Trevor. Thank you. –  Frankie Loscavio Aug 10 at 17:37
    
I love the logical operator usage on the console.log. –  Matt Murphy Dec 20 at 3:52

Was fooling around with FizzBuzz and JavaScript as comparison to C#.

Here's my version, heavily influenced by more rigid languages:

function FizzBuzz(aTarget) {
    for (var i = 1; i <= aTarget; i++) {
        var result = "";
        if (i%3 === 0) result += "Fizz";        
        if (i%5 === 0) result += "Buzz";
        if (result.length ===0) result = i;

        console.log(result);
    }
}

I like the structure and ease of read.

Now, what Trevor Dixon cleverly did is relay on the false-y values of the language (false , null , undefined , '' (the empty string) , 0 and NaN (Not a Number)) to shorten the code.
Now, the if (result.length ===0) result = i; line is redundant and the code will look like:

function FizzBuzz(aTarget) {
    for (var i = 1; i <= aTarget; i++) {
        var result = "";
        if (i%3 === 0) result += "Fizz";        
        if (i%5 === 0) result += "Buzz";

        console.log(result || i);
    }
}

Here we relay on the || operator to say : "if result is false, print the iteration value (i)". Cool trick, and I guess I need to play more with JavaScript in order to assimilate this logic.

You can see other examples (from GitHub) that will range from things like :

for (var i=1; i <= 20; i++)
{
    if (i % 15 == 0)
        console.log("FizzBuzz");
    else if (i % 3 == 0)
        console.log("Fizz");
    else if (i % 5 == 0)
        console.log("Buzz");
    else
        console.log(i);
}

No variables here, and just check for division by 15,3 & 5 (my above one only divides by 3 & 5, but has an extra variable, so I guess it's down to microbenchmarking for those who care, or style preferences).

To:

for(i=0;i<100;)console.log((++i%3?'':'Fizz')+(i%5?'':'Buzz')||i)

Which does it all in on line, relaying on the fact that 0 is a false value, so you can use that for the if-else shorthanded version (? :), in addition to the || trick we've seen before.

Here's a more readable version of the above, with some variables:

for (var i = 1; i <= 100; i++) {
  var f = i % 3 == 0, b = i % 5 == 0;
  console.log(f ? b ? "FizzBuzz" : "Fizz" : b ? "Buzz" : i);
}

All in all, you can do it in different ways, and I hope you picked up some nifty tips for use in JavaScript :)

share|improve this answer
for(i = 1; i < 101; i++) {  
  if(i % 3 === 0) {
      if(i % 5 === 0) {
          console.log("FizzBuzz");
      }
      else {
          console.log("Fizz");
      }
  }
  else if(i % 5 === 0) {
      console.log("Buzz");
  }
  else {
      console.log(i)
  }
}
share|improve this answer

In your by3 and by5 functions, you implicitly return undefined if it is applicable and false if it's not applicable, but your if statement is testing as if it returned true or false. Return true explicitly if it is applicable so your if statement picks it up.

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okay!, got that. Corrected that by adding return true;. –  pacmanfordinner May 18 '13 at 4:59
for (i=1; i<=100; i++) {
  output = "";
  if (i%5==0) output = "buzz"; 
  if (i%3==0) output = "fizz" + output;
  if (output=="") output = i;
  console.log(output);
}
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Functional style! JSBin Demo

// create a iterable array with a length of 100
// and map every value to a random number from 1 to a 100
var series = Array.apply(null, Array(100)).map(function() {
  return Math.round(Math.random() * 100) + 1;
});

// define the fizzbuzz function which takes an interger as input
// it evaluates the case expressions similar to Haskell's guards
var fizzbuzz = function (item) {
  switch (true) {
    case item % 15 === 0:
      console.log('fizzbuzz');
      break;
    case item % 3 === 0:
      console.log('fizz');
      break;
    case item % 5 === 0:
      console.log('buzz');
      break;
    default:
      console.log(item);
      break;
  }
};

// map the series values to the fizzbuzz function
series.map(fizzbuzz);
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Codeacademy sprang a FizzBuzz on me tonight. I had a vague memory that it was "a thing" so I did this. Not the best way, perhaps, but different from the above:

var data = {
    Fizz:3,
    Buzz:5
};

for (var i=1;i<=100;i++) {
    var value = '';
    for (var k in data) {
        value += i%data[k]?'':k;
    }
    console.log(value?value:i);
}

It relies on data rather than code. I that if there is an advantage to this approach, it is that you can go FizzBuzzBing 3 5 7 or further without adding additional logic, provided that you assign the object elements in the order your rules specify. For example:

var data = {
    Fizz:3,
    Buzz:5,
    Bing:7,
    Boom:11,
    Zing:13
};

for (var i=1;i<=1000;i++) {
    var value = '';
    for (var k in data) {
        value += i%data[k]?'':k;
    }
    console.log(value?value:i);
}
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Different functional style -- naive

fbRule = function(x,y,f,b,z){return function(z){return (z % (x*y) == 0 ? f+b: (z % x == 0 ? f : (z % y == 0  ? b: z)))  }}

range = function(n){return Array.apply(null, Array(n)).map(function (_, i) {return i+1;});}

range(100).map(fbRule(3,5, "fizz", "buzz"))

or, to incorporate structures as in above example: ie [[3, "fizz"],[5, "buzz"], ...]

fbRule = function(fbArr,z){
  return function(z){
    var ed = fbArr.reduce(function(sum, unit){return z%unit[0] === 0 ? sum.concat(unit[1]) : sum }, [] )
    return ed.length>0 ? ed.join("") : z
  }
} 

range = function(n){return Array.apply(null, Array(n)).map(function (_, i) {return i+1;});}

range(100).map(fbRule([[3, "fizz"],[5, "buzz"]]))
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