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Sorry for my english. Can you tell me minimal double type number aften which comupter start thinking that double type number equals zero?

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Zero is zero. Other numbers are not zero, floating point or not. What exactly are you asking? –  Carl Norum May 18 '13 at 6:32
    
@CarlNorum numbers such as 1e-10000 –  johnchen902 May 18 '13 at 6:33
    
@johnchen902 gave a right example –  NDGO May 18 '13 at 6:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Actual zero is zero. The result can become zero in different ways. A double has an value range of +/-10^+/-308 (roughly). A number smaller than the smallest number will be considered zero. Using #include <limits>, you can get numeric_limits<double>::denorm_min(), which is the smallest value that can be represented in a double.

But you can get "the effect of zero" in other ways. Say you have a fairly large number, 10 million, and you add (or subtract - read add as add or subtract in the rest of this paragraph) a very small number, say 1/10 million, then the addition will have no effect, because it is outside the actual value bits of the mantissa of the floating point number - that is, 53 bits in the case of double - then the effect will be the same as adding zero. In other words, even if you have a number that is not zero, using it to add to another number is not always going to change the other number.

See IEEE-754 on Wikipedia (other floating point formats do exist, but they are unusual).

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More precisely numeric_limits<double>::min(). –  TrueY May 18 '13 at 6:50
    
Thanks. Now fixed. –  Mats Petersson May 18 '13 at 6:55
    
1) denorm_min can be smaller than min, 2) rounding modes can cause arbitrarily small values to be rounded to denorm_min and not zero. –  Marc Glisse May 18 '13 at 7:31
1  
-1, until you change that numeric_limits<double>::min() to numeric_limits<double>::denorm_min(). numeric_limits<double>::min() is the smallest normalized number that can be represented as a double. Values smaller than that are possible. It's numeric_limits<double>::denorm_min() that is the smallest value that can be represented as a double. –  David Hammen May 18 '13 at 12:12
    
@DavidHammen: Updated. –  Mats Petersson May 18 '13 at 14:25

You could try:

#include <limits>
std::numeric_limits<double>::denorm_min();

Doc for denormal (aka subnormal) numbers (here).

If this number is divided by e.g. by 2 the result is 0.

To check this values on a specific platform the following code can be used:

#include <iostream>
#include <limits>
using std::cout;
using std::endl;

int main() {
    typedef double real;
    union dbl {
        real d;
        unsigned char c[sizeof(d)];

        dbl(const dbl &n = 0.0) : d(n.d) {}
        dbl(double n) : d(n) {}

        void pr(const char *txt = 0) const {
            if (txt) cout << txt << ": ";
            cout << d << ":";
            for (int i = sizeof(d) -1; i >= 0; --i)
                cout << std::hex << " " << (int)c[i];
            cout << endl;
        }
    };

    dbl n = 1.0;
    for (; n.d > 0.0; n.d /= 2.0)
        n.pr();
    n.pr("zero");
    n.d = std::numeric_limits<real>::min();
    n.pr("min");
    n.d = std::numeric_limits<real>::denorm_min();
    n.pr("denorm_min");
}

Output on 32 bit linux (intel cpu) (doc about double format):

1: 3f f0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0.5: 3f e0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0.25: 3f d0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0.125: 3f c0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0.0625: 3f b0 0 0 0 0 0 0
...
8.9003e-308: 0 30 0 0 0 0 0 0
4.45015e-308: 0 20 0 0 0 0 0 0
2.22507e-308: 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 0
1.11254e-308: 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 0
5.56268e-309: 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0
...
7.90505e-323: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10
3.95253e-323: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8
1.97626e-323: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4
9.88131e-324: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
4.94066e-324: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
zero: 0: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
min: 2.22507e-308: 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 0
denorm_min: 4.94066e-324: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

If real is defined as long double the output is:

1: 0 0 3f ff 80 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0.5: 0 0 3f fe 80 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0.25: 0 0 3f fd 80 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0.125: 0 0 3f fc 80 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0.0625: 0 0 3f fb 80 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
...
5.83232e-4950: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10
2.91616e-4950: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8
1.45808e-4950: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4
7.2904e-4951: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
3.6452e-4951: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
zero: 0: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
min: 3.3621e-4932: 0 0 0 1 80 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
denorm_min: 3.6452e-4951: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Or for float:

1: 3f 80 0 0
0.5: 3f 0 0 0
0.25: 3e 80 0 0
0.125: 3e 0 0 0
0.0625: 3d 80 0 0
...
2.24208e-44: 0 0 0 10
1.12104e-44: 0 0 0 8
5.60519e-45: 0 0 0 4
2.8026e-45: 0 0 0 2
1.4013e-45: 0 0 0 1
zero: 0: 0 0 0 0
min: 1.17549e-38: 0 80 0 0
denorm_min: 1.4013e-45: 0 0 0 1
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What about denorm_min? –  Marc Glisse May 18 '13 at 6:51
    
@MarcGlisse: you are right! I added to the answer. Thx! –  TrueY May 18 '13 at 6:57
    
But this doesn't answer the question. –  juanchopanza May 18 '13 at 7:09
    
@juanchopanza: a double with fraction less then denorm_min considered as zero. –  TrueY May 18 '13 at 7:39
    
@TrueY and how do you get that number? –  juanchopanza May 18 '13 at 7:41

In the single-precision 32-bit and double-precision 64-bit format IEEE 754

The smallest positive normal value of double is 0x1.0p-1022 2.2250738585072014E-308.

The smallest positive denormal value of double is 0x0.0000000000001P-1022 4.9e-324.

The smallest positive normal value of float is 0x1.0p-126f 1.17549435E-38f.

The smallest positive denormal value of float is 0x0.000002P-126f 1.4e-45f.

Positive numbers smaller than above may result in 0, depending on the rounding-mode as Marc Glisse commented.

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These values you state are platform dependent. You'd be better off taking them from the <limits> library. –  Adrian May 18 '13 at 6:42
    
Depends on the rounding mode, arbitrarily small numbers may be rounded to non-zero if the rounding direction is "up" or "away from zero". –  Marc Glisse May 18 '13 at 6:49

When you compare a double value that has been calculated, you should never check equality. You should check to see if is within a range. Not doing so would lead to the strong possibility that what you think is true is not so.

This is possibly a duplicate of this question.

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your advice is rather interesting, I will read "this question" –  NDGO May 18 '13 at 6:46

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