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a = 1;
b = "1";
if (a == b && a = 1) {
    console.log("a==b");
}

The Javascript code above will result in an error in the if statement in Google Chrome 26.0.1410.43:

Uncaught ReferenceError: Invalid left-hand side in assignment

I think this is because the variable a in the second part of the statement &&, a=1 cannot be assigned. However, when I try the code below, I'm totally confused!

a = 1;
b = "1";
if (a = 1 && a == b) {
    console.log("a==b");
}

Why is the one statement right but the other statement wrong?

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3  
What are you trying to accomplish here anyway? What should the code actually do? –  Ja͢ck May 18 '13 at 7:28
2  
Always use ( and ) for operator precedence –  Mehmet Ince May 18 '13 at 8:09
1  
You made a mistake here, you have to write like this if(a==1 && a == b). –  ashish2expert May 18 '13 at 13:20

4 Answers 4

= has lower operator precendence than both && and ==, which means that your first assignment turns into

if ((a == b && a) = 1) {

Since you can't assign to an expression in this way, this will give you an error.

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thanks!got it finally! –  sherlock May 18 '13 at 16:05
    
That was new to me, thanks for posting the link to MDN –  Ahmad Alfy May 23 '13 at 8:07

The second version is parsed as a = (1 && a == b); that is, the result of the expression 1 && a == b is assigned to a.

The first version does not work because the lefthand side of the assignment is not parsed as you expected. It parses the expression as if you're trying to assign a value to everything on the righthand side--(a == b && a) = 1.

This is all based on the precedence of the various operators. The problem here stems from the fact that = has a lower precedence than the other operators.

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2  
both expressions are parsed perfectly correctly. They're just not parsed the way the OP expected... –  Alnitak May 18 '13 at 7:24
    
@Alnitak: Yeah, I think your phrasing is better. –  Tikhon Jelvis May 18 '13 at 7:26
1  
See developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/… for the list of operator precedence –  MofX May 18 '13 at 7:35

Because the order of operations is not what you expect. a == b && a = 1 is equivalent to (a == b && a) = 1 which is equivalent to false = 1.

If you really want to do the assignment, you need to use parentheses around it: a == b && (a = 1).

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In if (a = 1 && a == b),

The operations to be first performed is 1 && a == b. 1 && the result of a == b is performed. The result of this && operation is assigned to a.

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This is not entirely correct. == has a higher precedence than &&. This results in the following evaluation order: 1. 1 2. && -> left hand side is already true, don't evaluate right hand side 3. a = 1 The result is the same as you said. But 1 && a is not evaluated first, it is 1 && (a == b) where the a == b is never evaluated. In general for a = b && c == d the evaluation order would be (assuming b is falsy): 1. b 2. c == d 3. b && (c == d) 4. a = (b && (c == d)) –  MofX May 18 '13 at 7:31
    
Sorry. I corrected the mistake. –  Deepu Benson May 18 '13 at 7:43
    
My comment is wrong as well ;) You got it right this time. With a && b given b will only be evaluated, if a is true. In my last comment I said a had to be false. –  MofX May 18 '13 at 7:46

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