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I made a comment yesterday on an answer where someone had used [0123456789] in a regular expression rather than [0-9] or \d. I said it was probably more efficient to use a range or digit specifier than a character set.

I decided to test that out today and found out to my surprise that (in the C# regex engine at least) \d appears to be less efficient than either of the other two which don't seem to differ much. Here is my test output over 10000 random strings of 1000 random characters with 5077 actually containing a digit:

Regular expression \d           took 00:00:00.2141226 result: 5077/10000
Regular expression [0-9]        took 00:00:00.1357972 result: 5077/10000  63.42 % of first
Regular expression [0123456789] took 00:00:00.1388997 result: 5077/10000  64.87 % of first

It's a surprise to me for two reasons:

  1. I would have thought the range would be implemented much more efficiently than the set.
  2. I can't understand why \d is worse than [0-9]. Is there more to \d than simply shorthand for [0-9]?

Here is the test code:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

namespace SO_RegexPerformance
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var rand = new Random(1234);
            var strings = new List<string>();
            //10K random strings
            for (var i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
            {
                //Generate random string
                var sb = new StringBuilder();
                for (var c = 0; c < 1000; c++)
                {
                    //Add a-z randomly
                    sb.Append((char)('a' + rand.Next(26)));
                }
                //In roughly 50% of them, put a digit
                if (rand.Next(2) == 0)
                {
                    //Replace one character with a digit, 0-9
                    sb[rand.Next(sb.Length)] = (char)('0' + rand.Next(10));
                }
                strings.Add(sb.ToString());
            }

            var baseTime = testPerfomance(strings, @"\d");
            Console.WriteLine();
            var testTime = testPerfomance(strings, "[0-9]");
            Console.WriteLine("  {0:P2} of first", testTime.TotalMilliseconds / baseTime.TotalMilliseconds);
            testTime = testPerfomance(strings, "[0123456789]");
            Console.WriteLine("  {0:P2} of first", testTime.TotalMilliseconds / baseTime.TotalMilliseconds);
        }

        private static TimeSpan testPerfomance(List<string> strings, string regex)
        {
            var sw = new Stopwatch();

            int successes = 0;

            var rex = new Regex(regex);

            sw.Start();
            foreach (var str in strings)
            {
                if (rex.Match(str).Success)
                {
                    successes++;
                }
            }
            sw.Stop();

            Console.Write("Regex {0,-12} took {1} result: {2}/{3}", regex, sw.Elapsed, successes, strings.Count);

            return sw.Elapsed;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
115  
Maybe \d deals with locales. E.g. Hebrew uses letters for digits. –  Barmar May 18 '13 at 7:20
5  
related: stackoverflow.com/a/6479605/674039 –  wim May 18 '13 at 15:04
26  
This is an interesting question precisely because \d does not mean the same thing in different languages. In Java, for example \d does indeed match 0-9 only –  Ray Toal May 18 '13 at 17:59
15  
@Barmar Hebrew does not use letters for digits normally, rather the same latin numeral digits [0-9]. Letters can be substituted for digits, but this is a rare use and reserved for special terms. I would not expect a regex parser to match כ"ג יורדי סירה (with כ"ג being a substitue for 23). Also, as can be seen in Sina Iravanian's answer, Hebrew letters do not appear as valid matches for \d. –  Yuval Adam May 20 '13 at 9:20
4  
Porting weston's code to Java yields: -- Regex \d took 00:00:00.043922 result: 4912/10000 -- Regex [0-9] took 00:00:00.073658 result: 4912/10000 167% of first -- Regex [0123456789] took 00:00:00.085799 result: 4912/10000 195% of first –  Lunchbox May 22 '13 at 16:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 1150 down vote accepted

\d checks all Unicode digits, while [0-9] is limited to these 10 characters. For example, Persian digits, ۱۲۳۴۵۶۷۸۹, are an example of Unicode digits which are matched with \d, but not [0-9].

You can generate a list of all such characters using the following code:

var sb = new StringBuilder();
for(UInt16 i = 0; i < UInt16.MaxValue; i++)
{
    string str = Convert.ToChar(i).ToString();
    if (Regex.IsMatch(str, @"\d"))
        sb.Append(str);
}
Console.WriteLine(sb.ToString());

Which generates:

0123456789٠١٢٣٤٥٦٧٨٩۰۱۲۳۴۵۶۷۸۹߀߁߂߃߄߅߆߇߈߉०१२३४५६७८९০১২৩৪৫৬৭৮৯੦੧੨੩੪੫੬੭੮੯૦૧૨૩૪૫૬૭૮૯୦୧୨୩୪୫୬୭୮୯௦௧௨௩௪௫௬௭௮௯౦౧౨౩౪౫౬౭౮౯೦೧೨೩೪೫೬೭೮೯൦൧൨൩൪൫൬൭൮൯๐๑๒๓๔๕๖๗๘๙໐໑໒໓໔໕໖໗໘໙༠༡༢༣༤༥༦༧༨༩၀၁၂၃၄၅၆၇၈၉႐႑႒႓႔႕႖႗႘႙០១២៣៤៥៦៧៨៩᠐᠑᠒᠓᠔᠕᠖᠗᠘᠙᥆᥇᥈᥉᥊᥋᥌᥍᥎᥏᧐᧑᧒᧓᧔᧕᧖᧗᧘᧙᭐᭑᭒᭓᭔᭕᭖᭗᭘᭙᮰᮱᮲᮳᮴᮵᮶᮷᮸᮹᱀᱁᱂᱃᱄᱅᱆᱇᱈᱉᱐᱑᱒᱓᱔᱕᱖᱗᱘᱙꘠꘡꘢꘣꘤꘥꘦꘧꘨꘩꣐꣑꣒꣓꣔꣕꣖꣗꣘꣙꤀꤁꤂꤃꤄꤅꤆꤇꤈꤉꩐꩑꩒꩓꩔꩕꩖꩗꩘꩙0123456789

share|improve this answer
84  
Here is a more complete list of digits that aren't 0-9: fileformat.info/info/unicode/category/Nd/list.htm –  Robert McKee May 18 '13 at 7:29
5  
@weston Unicode has 17 planes with 16 bits each. Most important characters are in the basic plane, but some special characters, mostly Chinese, are in the supplemental planes. Dealing with those in C# is a bit annoying. –  CodesInChaos May 18 '13 at 7:55
6  
@RobertMcKee: Nitpick: The full unicode character set is actually 21 bit (17 planes of 16 bit each). But of course a 21-bit-datatype is impractical, so if you use a power-of-2 datatype, it's true that you need 32 bit. –  sleske May 18 '13 at 21:32
9  
@sleske If you're going to nitpick, 21 bits could encode 32 planes of 16 bits. 20 bits would be 16 planes of 16 bits. In an information theoretic sense, there are fewer than 21 bits necessary to encode a single Unicode character. The decimal representation of log_2(17 * 2^16) is 20.087.... It's closer to 20.1 than 21 bits of information. Pedantry aside, this thread is a good example of why UTF-16 should be considered harmful; working in 16 bit units leads to mistakes. –  Brian Campbell May 20 '13 at 2:00
3  
It'll never be changed -- until they need to change it. –  Robert McKee Jul 8 '13 at 21:00

Credit to ByteBlast for noticing this in the docs. Just changing the regex constructor:

var rex = new Regex(regex, RegexOptions.ECMAScript);

Gives new timings:

Regex \d           took 00:00:00.1355787 result: 5077/10000
Regex [0-9]        took 00:00:00.1360403 result: 5077/10000  100.34 % of first
Regex [0123456789] took 00:00:00.1362112 result: 5077/10000  100.47 % of first
share|improve this answer
5  
What does the RegexOptions.ECMAScript do? –  this.lau_ May 20 '13 at 1:36
4  
From Regular Expression Options: "Enable ECMAScript-compliant behavior for the expression." –  chrisaycock May 20 '13 at 1:58
64  
Effectively, I think it removes support for Unicode. –  0xFE May 20 '13 at 3:33
17  
@0xFE: Not quite. Unicode escapes are still valid in ECMAScript (\u1234). It's "just" the shorthand character classes that change meaning (like \d) and the Unicode property/script shorthands that go away (like \p{N}). –  Tim Pietzcker May 20 '13 at 9:51
7  
This is not an answer to the "why" part. It is a "fix the symptoms" answer. Still valuable information. –  usr May 29 '13 at 16:52

From Does “\d” in regex mean a digit?:

[0-9] isn't equivalent to \d. [0-9] matches only 0123456789 characters, while \d matches [0-9] and other digit characters, for example Eastern Arabic numerals ٠١٢٣٤٥٦٧٨٩

share|improve this answer
43  
According to: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/20bw873z.aspx If ECMAScript-compliant behavior is specified, \d is equivalent to [0-9]. –  ByteBlast May 18 '13 at 7:30
1  
huh, am i wrong or this sentence from the link is telling the opposite. "\d matches any decimal digit. It is equivalent to the \p{Nd} regular expression pattern, which includes the standard decimal digits 0-9 as well as the decimal digits of a number of other character sets." –  IsThatSo May 18 '13 at 7:51
3  
@ByteBlast thanks, using the constructor: var rex = new Regex(regex, RegexOptions.ECMAScript); makes them all pretty much indistinguishable in performance terms. –  weston May 18 '13 at 7:53
1  
oh anyway, thanks everyone. this question turned out to be a great learning for me. –  IsThatSo May 18 '13 at 7:54
3  
Please don't "just copy" answers from other questions. If the question is a duplicate, flag it as such. –  BoltClock May 18 '13 at 12:00

An addition to top answer from Sina Iravianian, here is a .NET 4.5 version (since only that version supports UTF16 output, c.f. the first three lines) of his code, using the full range of Unicode code points. Due to the lack of proper support for higher Unicode planes, many people are not aware of always checking for and including the upper Unicode planes. Nevertheless they sometimes do contain some important characters.

public static void Main()
{
    var unicodeEncoding = new UnicodeEncoding(!BitConverter.IsLittleEndian, false);
    Console.InputEncoding = unicodeEncoding;
    Console.OutputEncoding = unicodeEncoding;

    var sb = new StringBuilder();
    for (var codePoint = 0; codePoint <= 0x10ffff; codePoint++)
    {
        var isSurrogateCodePoint = codePoint <= UInt16.MaxValue 
               && (  char.IsLowSurrogate((char) codePoint) 
                  || char.IsHighSurrogate((char) codePoint)
                  );

        if (isSurrogateCodePoint)
            continue;

        var codePointString = char.ConvertFromUtf32(codePoint);

        if (Regex.IsMatch(codePointString, @"\d"))
            sb.AppendFormat("{0} ", codePointString);
    }
    Console.WriteLine(sb.ToString());

    Console.ReadKey();
}

Yielding the following output:

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ٠ ١ ٢ ٣ ٤ ٥ ٦ ٧ ٨ ٩ ۰ ۱ ۲ ۳ ۴ ۵ ۶ ۷ ۸ ۹ ߀ ߁ ߂ ߃ ߄ ߅ ߆ ߇ ߈ ߉ ० १ २ ३ ४ ५ ६ ७ ८ ९
০ ১ ২ ৩ ৪ ৫ ৬ ৭ ৮ ৯ ੦ ੧ ੨ ੩ ੪ ੫ ੬ ੭ ੮ ੯ ૦ ૧ ૨ ૩ ૪ ૫ ૬ ૭ ૮ ૯ ୦ ୧ ୨ ୩ ୪ ୫ ୬ ୭ ୮ ୯ ௦ ௧ ௨ ௩ ௪ ௫ ௬ ௭ ௮ ௯
౦ ౧ ౨ ౩ ౪ ౫ ౬ ౭ ౮ ౯ ೦ ೧ ೨ ೩ ೪ ೫ ೬ ೭ ೮ ೯ ൦ ൧ ൨ ൩ ൪ ൫ ൬ ൭ ൮ ൯
๐ ๑ ๒ ๓ ๔ ๕ ๖ ๗ ๘ ๙ ໐ ໑ ໒ ໓ ໔ ໕ ໖ ໗ ໘ ໙ ༠ ༡ ༢ ༣ ༤ ༥ ༦ ༧ ༨ ༩ ၀ ၁ ၂ ၃ ၄ ၅ ၆ ၇ ၈ ၉ ႐ ႑ ႒ ႓ ႔ ႕ ႖ ႗ ႘ ႙
០ ១ ២ ៣ ៤ ៥ ៦ ៧ ៨ ៩ ᠐ ᠑ ᠒ ᠓ ᠔ ᠕ ᠖ ᠗ ᠘ ᠙ ᥆ ᥇ ᥈ ᥉ ᥊ ᥋ ᥌ ᥍ ᥎ ᥏ ᧐ ᧑ ᧒ ᧓ ᧔ ᧕ ᧖ ᧗ ᧘ ᧙ ᭐ ᭑ ᭒ ᭓ ᭔ ᭕ ᭖ ᭗ ᭘ ᭙ ᮰ ᮱ ᮲ ᮳ ᮴ ᮵ ᮶
᮷ ᮸ ᮹ ᱀ ᱁ ᱂ ᱃ ᱄ ᱅ ᱆ ᱇ ᱈ ᱉ ᱐ ᱑ ᱒ ᱓ ᱔ ᱕ ᱖ ᱗ ᱘ ᱙ ꘠ ꘡ ꘢ ꘣ ꘤ ꘥ ꘦ ꘧ ꘨ ꘩ ꣐ ꣑ ꣒ ꣓ ꣔ ꣕ ꣖ ꣗ ꣘ ꣙ ꤀ ꤁ ꤂ ꤃ ꤄
꤅ ꤆ ꤇ ꤈ ꤉ ꩐ ꩑ ꩒ ꩓ ꩔ ꩕ ꩖ ꩗ ꩘ ꩙ 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
share|improve this answer
    
The sad thing is that the Win32 Console does not display astral characters –  Sebastian Godelet May 27 at 21:57
    
Not that it makes a difference here, but the upper bound should actually be <=, not < - U+10FFFF is a valid codepoint. –  Porges Jun 17 at 22:15
    
@Porges, thanks for pointing that out. I hate "off by one" errors ;-) –  Sebastian Godelet Jun 18 at 8:12

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