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In the process of writing a wrapper to arbitrary cancellable code that's supposed to run while a certain condition holds true (which has to be verified regularly), I came across interesting behavior in the interaction between CancellationTokenSource, Threading.Timer, and async/await generated code.

In a nutshell, what it looks like is that if you have some cancellable Task that you're awaiting on and then you cancel that Task from a Timer callback, the code that follows the cancelled task executes as part of the cancel request itself.

In the program below, if you add tracing you'll see that execution of the Timer callback blocks in the cts.Cancel() call, and that the code after the awaited task that gets cancelled by that call executes in the same thread as the cts.Cancel() call itself.

The program below is doing the following:

  1. Create cancellation token source for cancelling work that we're going to simulate;
  2. create timer that will be used to cancel work after it has started;
  3. program timer to go off 100ms from now;
  4. start said work, just idling for 200ms;
    • timer callback kicks in, cancelling the Task.Delay "work", then sleeping for 500ms to demonstrate that timer disposal waits for this;
  5. verify that work gets cancelled as expected;
  6. cleanup timer, making sure that the timer does not get invoked after this point, and that if it was already running we block here waiting for it to complete (pretend there was more work afterwards that would not work properly if it the timer callback was running at the same time).
namespace CancelWorkFromTimer
{
    using System;
    using System.Diagnostics;
    using System.Threading;
    using System.Threading.Tasks;

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            bool finished = CancelWorkFromTimer().Wait(2000);
            Console.WriteLine("Finished in time?: {0} after {1}ms; press ENTER to exit", finished, sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        private static async Task CancelWorkFromTimer()
        {
            using (var cts = new CancellationTokenSource())
            using (var cancelTimer = new Timer(_ => { cts.Cancel(); Thread.Sleep(500); }))
            {
                // Set cancellation to occur 100ms from now, after work has already started
                cancelTimer.Change(100, -1);
                try
                {
                    // Simulate work, expect to be cancelled
                    await Task.Delay(200, cts.Token);
                    throw new Exception("Work was not cancelled as expected.");
                }
                catch (OperationCanceledException exc)
                {
                    if (exc.CancellationToken != cts.Token)
                    {
                        throw;
                    }
                }
                // Dispose cleanly of timer
                using (var disposed = new ManualResetEvent(false))
                {
                    if (cancelTimer.Dispose(disposed))
                    {
                        disposed.WaitOne();
                    }
                }

                // Pretend that here we need to do more work that can only occur after
                // we know that the timer callback is not executing and will no longer be
                // called.

                // DO MORE WORK HERE
            }
        }
    }
}

The simplest way of making this work as I was expecting it to work when I first wrote it is to use cts.CancelAfter(0) instead of cts.Cancel(). According to documentation, cts.Cancel() will run any registered callbacks synchronously, and my guess is that in this case, with the interaction with async/await generated code, all code that's after the point where the cancellation took place is running as part of that. cts.CancelAfter(0) decouples the execution of those callbacks from its own execution.

Has anyone run into this before? In a case like this, is cts.CancelAfter(0) the best option to avoid the deadlock?

share|improve this question
    
If you eliminate the using(var disposed = ...) block it works as expected. How sure are you that this (second) dispose of the timer is necessary? –  Henk Holterman May 18 '13 at 13:54
    
@HenkHolterman: In this example it wouldn't matter but if there was code after it that couldn't be run safely until we knew that the timer callback was no longer running and wouldn't be called again, then that block is the way to ensure that (MSDN docs) –  observer May 18 '13 at 21:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This behavior is because an async method's continuation is scheduled with TaskContinuationOptions.ExecuteSynchronously. I ran into a similar issue and blogged about it here. AFAIK, that's the only place this behavior is documented. (As a side note, it's an implementation detail and could change in the future).

There are a few alternative approaches; you'll have to decide which one is best.

First, is there any way the timer could be replaced by CancelAfter? Depending on the nature of the work after the cts is cancelled, something like this might work:

async Task CleanupAfterCancellationAsync(CancellationToken token)
{
  try { await token.AsTask(); }
  catch (OperationCanceledException) { }
  await Task.Delay(500); // remainder of the timer callback goes here
}

(using AsTask from my AsyncEx library; it's not hard to build AsTask yourself if you prefer)

Then you could use it like this:

var cts = new CancellationTokenSource();
var cleanupCompleted = CleanupAfterCancellationAsync(cts.Token);
cts.CancelAfter(100);
...
try
{
  await Task.Delay(200, cts.Token);
  throw new Exception("Work was not cancelled as expected.");
}
catch (OperationCanceledException exc) { }
await cleanupCompleted;
...

Or...

You could replace the Timer with an async method:

static async Task TimerReplacementAsync(CancellationTokenSource cts)
{
  await Task.Delay(100);
  cts.Cancel();
  await Task.Delay(500); // remainder of the timer callback goes here
}

Used as such:

var cts = new CancellationTokenSource();
var cleanupCompleted = TimerReplacementAsync(cts);
...
try
{
  await Task.Delay(200, cts.Token);
  throw new Exception("Work was not cancelled as expected.");
}
catch (OperationCanceledException exc) { }
await cleanupCompleted;
...

Or...

You could just kick off the cancellation in a Task.Run:

using (var cancelTimer = new Timer(_ => { Task.Run(() => cts.Cancel()); Thread.Sleep(500); }))

I don't like this solution as well as the others because you still end up with synchronous blocking (ManualResetEvent.WaitOne) inside an async method which isn't recommended.

share|improve this answer
    
@StephenClearly: Your alternatives would work well for my sample (which I may have oversimplified a bit too much), but I have a few more restrictions for the real code where I found this problem: the timer is not just for cancellation but it's for periodically renewing ownership of a resource that the being done depends on (here replaced with the Task.Delay call). If it's unable to renew ownership in the resource it has to abort the work as soon as possible. When the work completes without being be cancelled, I want to stop timer and any renewal attempts from it, then release the resource. –  observer May 18 '13 at 22:04
    
(cont.) For the sake of simplicity of implementation I think I can get away with the assumption that the release of the resource would always win over the renewal. What caught me by surprise was seeing all code after Task.Delay being executed as part of the Cancel call that cancelled it. I think I understand why now, which is why I think I'll explore using CancelAfter(0) from the callback instead of Cancel (which I know by itself fixes the issue in the sample) and probably looking into using ThreadPool.RegisterWaitForSingleObject to wait for Dispose(). –  observer May 18 '13 at 22:15
    
(cont.) Of course I'd take into account your great comments about ThreadPool.RegisterWaitForSingleObject in this thread. :) –  observer May 18 '13 at 22:17
    
I would recommend Task.Run over CancelAfter(0) because you never know if a future framework update will "optimize" CancelAfter(0) into a plain Cancel(). Followup question: is it possible to restructure your logic so that the resource is only acquired when needed? .NET 4.5 adds async-compatible methods to the SemaphoreSlim type, so now SemaphoreSlim can be used to share resources between async and synchronous code. –  Stephen Cleary May 18 '13 at 23:06
    
There are also a lot of other async techniques available, but right now they're spread out in different resources (I've got a lot of them on my blog, but not all of them). If you could collect semantic requirements (and post them in a different question), then we might find a better solution. –  Stephen Cleary May 18 '13 at 23:10

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