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When I'm working on 3D graphics projects I often stumble across the problem of having to draw a cube. Thing is, I thus far have not found a better method to draw one other than specifying EVERY vertex, normal and occasionally texture coordinate. Given the regularity of a cube, I can't shake the feeling there has to be a better method.

So, is there an easier method than something like this:

    putNormal(geometryBuffer, 0, 0, 1);
    putVertex(geometryBuffer, x, y, 1);
    putNormal(geometryBuffer, 0, 0, 1);
    putVertex(geometryBuffer, x + 1, y, 1);
    putNormal(geometryBuffer, 0, 0, 1);
    putVertex(geometryBuffer, x + 1, y + 1, 1);
    putNormal(geometryBuffer, 0, 0, 1);
    putVertex(geometryBuffer, x, y + 1, 1);

    putNormal(geometryBuffer, -1, 0, 0);
    putVertex(geometryBuffer, x, y, 0);
    putNormal(geometryBuffer, -1, 0, 0);
    putVertex(geometryBuffer, x + 1, y, 0);
    putNormal(geometryBuffer, -1, 0, 0);
    putVertex(geometryBuffer, x + 1, y, 1);
    putNormal(geometryBuffer, -1, 0, 0);
    putVertex(geometryBuffer, x, y, 1);

    //and so on..
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No, but there are libraries that can do it for you. And what is wrong with having one generic function to do it for you anyway? –  iccthedral May 18 '13 at 10:37
    
search Google for function –  Alnitak May 18 '13 at 10:50
    
"Given the regularity of a cube, I can't shake the feeling there has to be a better method." What is "regular" about a cube? It's not smooth or continuous, topologically. –  Nicol Bolas May 18 '13 at 11:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The openGL Utility library (GLU) provides some utilities for more complex shapes like spheres, nurbs, quadrics (those aren't cubes), and so forth, but despite cubes being quick, programmers tend to lay out the faces differently and have different idea about how many things to bind to each vertex, so it's not entirely as obvious as one would think.

More information is available at: http://www.glprogramming.com/red/chapter11.html

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Use the method glutSolidCube from the class GLUT in the package com.jogamp.opengl.util.gl2, like this:

 GLUT glut = new GLUT();
 glut.glutSolidCube(size);
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The GLUT package does have some additional tools, but there's a steep cost associated with the programming model that GLUT requires which can really smack a developer in the face after a while. No support for arbitrary client data with callbacks was one, if I remember correctly, but there were a number of other issues. Recommending GLUT amounts to recommending an entire paradigm, and not one always well suited to more complex scenarios. –  Alex North-Keys May 18 '13 at 15:21

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