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Created the below code whilst playing with loops. The code below stores the Fibonacci values into an array and then prints them using for loops.

    int [] numbers;
    numbers = new int[25];

    numbers[0] = 1;
    numbers[1] = 1;
    System.out.println("Initializing the array values");

    for(int i = 2; i < numbers.length; i++)
    {
        numbers[i] = numbers[i-1] + numbers[i-2];
    }

    System.out.println("Printing out Fibonacci values");

    for(int i = 0; i < numbers.length; i++)
    {
        System.out.print(numbers[i] + ", ");
    }

The above code works fine. The first time I threw it together though, I used an enhanced for loop to print out the values (the second for loop in the code). This compiles fine, but when I run it I get the following;

Initializing the array values
Printing out Fibonacci values
1, 1, 2, 3, 8, 34, 377, 17711, Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException: 34
at ArrayDemo.main(ArrayDemo.java:21)

I don't get what went wrong. Changing the second loop shouldn't change the values (you'll notice the fibonacci values are wrong (ie missing values)). And I don't get why a simple enhanced for loop would skip indexes. Now, this isn't really a big deal because this isn't for a project or anything, it just bugs me that I can't figure out why it's doing it. Any clues?

Edit: The enhanced for loop just looked like this;

for(int i : numbers)
    {
        System.out.print(numbers[i] + ", ");
    }
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
for(int i : numbers)
{
     System.out.print(numbers[i] + ", ");
}

i here is the elements in the array, not the indexes. It could be bigger than numbers.length.

For example, if numbers = {1,2,3,9} then i will be 1, 2, 3, 9. But its length is 4, so when you loop on the elements inside it, you're trying to do numbers[9] which exceeds its size.

You probably want to System.out.print(i + ", ");

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1  
Thank you. Concise and easy to understand. –  Rudi May 18 '13 at 11:20

for(int i = 0; i <= numbers.length; i++) should be

for(int i = 0; i < numbers.length; i++)

In java, arrays are 0 based indexing. It means that your first element should be accessed at the index 0 and obviously the last at the length of your array minus 1.

int tab[] = new int[3]; //tab of length 3
tab[0] = 11;
tab[1] = 24;
tab[2] = 5;

Here you access the last element by calling tab[2] or tab[tab.length-1], which is equivalent.


Apologies, that was just a mistake in the code I put up in the question.

The problem is that you should do : System.out.print(i + ", "); You should read this and this about enhanced for loop.

The for statement also has another form designed for iteration through Collections and arrays This form is sometimes referred to as the enhanced for statement, and can be used to make your loops more compact and easy to read. To demonstrate, consider the following array, which holds the numbers 1 through 10:

int[] numbers = {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10};

The following program, EnhancedForDemo, uses the enhanced for to loop through the array:

class EnhancedForDemo {
    public static void main(String[] args){
         int[] numbers = 
             {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10};
         for (int item : numbers) {
             System.out.println("Count is: " + item);
         }
    }
}

In this example, the variable item holds the current value from the numbers array.

So item holds the current value from the numbers array and not the current index. That's why you get an IOOBE.

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3  
Quick explanation about 0 based indexing would make this a great answer! –  christopher May 18 '13 at 11:09
    
Apologies, that was just a mistake in the code I put up in the question. That was done right the first time. It still doesn't explain why the enhanced for loop doesn't work. I've edited the question code to reflect this. –  Rudi May 18 '13 at 11:13
for(int i : numbers)
{
    System.out.print(numbers[i] + ", ");
}

should be

   for(int i : numbers)
    {
        System.out.print(i + ", ");
    }

You don't need to use indexes in enhanced for-loop.

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