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In this Haskell-like comprehensions implementation in Ruby there's some code I've never seen in Ruby:

class Array
  def +@
    # implementation
  end

  def -@
    # implementation
  end
end

What do def +@ and def -@ mean? Where to find (semi-)official informations about them?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 14 down vote accepted

They are unary + and - methods. They are called when you write -object or +object. The syntax +x, for example, is replaced with x.+@.

Consider this:

class Foo
  def +(other_foo)
    puts 'binary +'
  end

  def +@
    puts 'unary +'
  end
end

f = Foo.new
g = Foo.new

+ f   
# unary +

f + g 
# binary +

f + (+ g) 
# unary +
# binary +

Another less contrived example:

class Array
  def -@
    map(&:-@)
  end
end

- [1, 2, -3]
# => [-1, -2, 3]

They are mentioned here and there's an article about how to define them here.

share|improve this answer
    
[]+[] or []+([]) after that definition does not return an error. –  sawa May 18 '13 at 12:23
2  
@sawa: That's because Array already comes with a binary + method. –  hammar May 18 '13 at 12:25
    
@sawa What error are you expecting? –  toro2k May 18 '13 at 12:29
    
If Array#+ is overridden as a unary method, then it should return an error when an argument is passed. –  sawa May 18 '13 at 12:35
2  
That's not Array#+ it is Array#+@. –  toro2k May 18 '13 at 12:35

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