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I'm trying to read a text file containing integers via stdin and store the values in a 9x9 array (please note that the file must be read via stdin and not as an arg)

This is what I have:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <ctype.h>


int main()
{
    int puzzle[9][9];
    int i,j,count=0;  
    char value[81];

    for( i = 0; i < 9; i++ ) {  
      for( j = 0; j < 9; j++ ) {  
        scanf("%c", &value[count]);  
        puzzle[i][j] = value[count] - '0'; 
        count++;  
      }
    }
}

But it doesn't seem to convert the ASCII characters from scanf to int, which is what I thought the value[count] - '0' was supposed to do, so I end up getting values like this:

-16-16-160-16-160-16-161

Basically i'm trying to do exactly whats described in this thread, but in C instead of C++:

How to convert a 2d char array to a 2d int array?

Edit -

The input file looks like this (contains both white space and new lines):

   0  0  1  9  0  0  0  0  8         
   6  0  0  0  8  5  0  3  0     
   0  0  7  0  6  0  1  0  0     
   0  3  4  0  9  0  0  0  0     
   0  0  0  5  0  4  0  0  0     
   0  0  0  0  1  0  4  2  0     
   0  0  5  0  7  0  9  0  0
   0  1  0  8  6  0  0  0  7
   7  0  0  0  0  9  2  0  0        
share|improve this question
4  
The %c conversion doesn't skip initial whitespace. Use scanf(" %c", &value[count]); while I look for a duplicate. – Daniel Fischer May 18 '13 at 12:33
3  
@DanielFischer "while I look for a duplicate.". lol – Maroun Maroun May 18 '13 at 12:34
2  
If the text file contains integers and You don't need for the value array, You can directly scanf them with %d into the puzzle array – gkovacs90 May 18 '13 at 12:35
1  
possible duplicate of scanf not taking in data – Daniel Fischer May 18 '13 at 12:55
1  
@MarounMaroun Otherwise, I would have answered the question. Would have been faster, and could have earned an upvote or two. – Daniel Fischer May 18 '13 at 13:16
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is not with the conversion line puzzle[i][j] = value[count] - '0';. The problem lies with the following scanf() statement, scanf("%c", &value[count]);. The scanf is reading the first white space. Use scanf(" %c", &value[count]); to read the input.

share|improve this answer

%c does eactly what it should: it reads one character. D'oh, it's whitespace? That doesn't matter. This is why...

  • ... you shouldn't use %c but %d for scanning integers;

  • ...you shouldn't use scanf() at all for something simple like this.

What I'd do if I were you:

int matrix[9][9];
int i = 0;

char buf[0x100];
while (fgets(buf, sizeof(buf), stdin)) {
    char *end;
    char *p = strtok_r(buf, " ", &end);
    while (p) {
        matrix[i / 9][i % 9] = strtol(p, NULL, 10);
        i++;
        p = strtok_r(NULL, " ", &end);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Is there any reason this doesn't work? Scan them in as integers.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <ctype.h>


int main()
{
    int puzzle[9][9];
    int i,j,count=0;  
    char value[81];

    for( i = 0; i < 9; i++ ) {  
      for( j = 0; j < 9; j++ ) {  
        scanf("%d", &value[count]);  
        puzzle[i][j] = value[count];
        printf("%d", puzzle[i][j]); //to verify it is stored correctly
        count++;  
      }
    }
}

EDIT: since you said it's coming from a file, i copy/pasted the sample file you gave into C:\file.txt, and the following code appears to work just dandy.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <ctype.h>


int main()
{
    FILE *fp;
    int puzzle[9][9];
    int i,j,count=0;  
    int value[81];
    fp = fopen("C:\\file.txt", "r");
    for( i = 0; i < 9; i++ ) {  
      for( j = 0; j < 9; j++ ) {
        fscanf(fp, " %d", &value[count]);
        puzzle[i][j] = value[count];
        printf("element %d is %d\n",count,  puzzle[i][j]);
        count++;

      }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
It gives a warning format ‘%d’ expects type ‘int *’, but argument 2 has type ‘char *’, but still runs. Strangely, it doesn't seem to scan some digits properly too. – Martin May 18 '13 at 12:53
    
Should directly scan into puzzle, scanf(%d", &puzzle[i][j]);. – Daniel Fischer May 18 '13 at 12:56
    
You are quite right. The intermediate value array is apparently unnecessary, unless the author has some other purpose for it – Tadgh May 18 '13 at 13:07
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>


int main()
{
    //I relized that my solution need an other way of declaration and allocation
    //int puzzle[9][9];
    int *puzzle= (int*)malloc(9*9*sizeof(int));
    int i,j;  

    for( i = 0; i < 9; i++ ) {  
      for( j = 0; j < 9; j++ ) {  
        scanf("%d", puzzle+9*i+j)
      }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This gets the pointer arithmetic wrong. – user529758 May 18 '13 at 12:45
    
And you have the wrong type of pointer for the format, puzzle + 9*i + j is an int(*)[9]. – Daniel Fischer May 18 '13 at 12:50
    
@Daniel Fischer - Thank You, I edited it, this should be a working one – gkovacs90 May 18 '13 at 12:55
    
@H2CO3 - what would the correct pointer manipulation be in this case, please? Thanks. – Bob Jarvis May 18 '13 at 12:55
    
@gkovacs90 Still not perfect, don't cast the return value of malloc(), and better use sizeof(*puzzle) instead of sizeof(int), for obvious security reasons. – user529758 May 18 '13 at 12:58

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