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I'm trying to write a C program, that make user able to write stuff in a file. My Problem is that after making and running the program the file stay empty ?? any idea how can I solve this.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <unistd.h>


// the user should give a  file to write the file
int main (int argc , char**argv)
{
    int fd; // file descriptor
    char ret; // the character
    int offset;
    if(argc != 2) {
        printf("You have to give the name or the path of the file to work with \n");
        printf("Exiting the program \n")
        return -1;
    }



    fd = open (argv[1], O_WRONLY/*write*/|O_CREAT/*create if not found */, S_IRUSR|S_IWUSR/*user can read and write*/);
    if (fd == -1) {
        printf("can'T open the file ");
        return -1;
    }

    printf("At wich position you want to start ");
    scanf("%d",&offset);
    lseek(fd,offset,SEEK_SET);
    while(1) {
        ret = getchar();
        if(ret == '1') {
            printf("closing the file");
            close (fd);
            return 1;
        }
        else
            write (fd,red, sizeof(char));
    }

    return 0;
}

thanks in advance for you help.

share|improve this question
    
Use fopen and test for NULL –  Floris May 18 '13 at 13:29
    
Also,what compiler are you using? check out how power on warnings. –  Jack May 18 '13 at 13:47
    
Copy-paste the code you are using. The one you show us does not compile. –  Alexandre C. May 18 '13 at 13:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One error I can notice, the call of write function:

write (fd,red, sizeof(char));

should be:

write (fd, &red, sizeof(char));

You forgot & before red, write need address.

syntax of write: int write( int handle, void *buffer, int nbyte );

This will cause an undefined behavior in your code at run time

Edit: in write function you are using red that is not defined, I think it should be ret variable in your code. correct it as write (fd, &ret, sizeof(char));

second, you forgot ; after printf("Exiting the program \n") in if, but I also think its mistake while posting question as you says you are getting run time error.

side note: If you are using gcc compiler then you can use gcc -Wall -pedantic to generate warnings

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for the -Wall recommendation –  simonc May 18 '13 at 13:59

I have made some changes,this should work:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main (int argc , char**argv) 
{
   int fd; // file descriptor 
   char ret; // the character 
   int offset; 
   if(argc != 2){
     printf("You have to give the name or the path of the file to work with \n");
     printf("Exiting the program \n"); **//There was ';' missing here**
     return -1;
  }
  fd = open (argv[1], O_WRONLY|O_CREAT,S_IRUSR|S_IWUSR);
  if (fd == -1) {
     printf("can'T open the file ");
     return -1;
  }

  printf("At wich position you want to start ");
  scanf("%d",&offset);
  lseek(fd,offset,SEEK_SET);
  while(1){
     ret = getchar();
     if(ret == '1'){
     printf("closing the file");
     close (fd);
     return 1;
  }
  else 
     write (fd,&ret, sizeof(char)); **//red has been changed to &ret**
}

  return 0;

}

share|improve this answer
1  
It'd be worth noting which lines you changed and explaining why they were needed. That'd help the o/p learn how to avoid these mistakes next time. –  simonc May 18 '13 at 14:00
    
Sure simonc. I am new here. I will make it a practice. Thank you for the feedback. –  Denzil May 18 '13 at 14:02

It should be:

write (fd,&ret, sizeof(char));

write takes the pointer to the memory position, and since ret is a single char, you need to pass a pointer to it.

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