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Look at my code in this post:

How to write simple speed test app with CUDA?

This time I'm not about the CUDA, but the code of application that is in the post. The issue I want to face is that the application is pretty unstable in case of total score it returns. After first time I compiled it it was returning value between 12.2 - 12.5 mld with test time equal to 10 secons but today after PC turn off and on it keeps returning value approx. 15 mld with the same test time. I thought for a moment that something happened to my PC, but in other professional tests it's much more stable - eg. mdcrackGUI benchmark always returns me approx. 132 million as the first value every time I run it. However after a moment of clever thinking I had the fallowing questions:

  1. I have 8 logical CPU cores, but I'm not sure that each computing thread is using only one and the same logical core while test is running. How to modify the code to ensure this if it's possible ?

  2. There are 8 computing threads but I have 4 not 8 physical core CPU(because of HT technology). As I guess this means that all 8 threads won't really run in parallel. If there is positive answer to first question then wouldn't this app be more stable if I use only 4 computing threads, each on diffrent physical core ?

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closed as not constructive by Hans Passant, Luca Geretti, Linus Caldwell, Trinimon, Stephane Rolland May 19 '13 at 9:40

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Getting benchmark results to reproduce consistently is a black art that's mostly based on blatant lies. There are numerous factors that affect the perf of code, including the other odd thousand threads that run on your machine that want a piece of the processor as well. Even environmental factors like temperature. Just don't bother. –  Hans Passant May 18 '13 at 15:42
    
Use thread affinity to bind a thread to a core. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/… –  brian beuning May 18 '13 at 15:44
    
I fully agree with @Hans. Additionally it is almost always pointless to try to outsmart the OS scheduler and bind threads to a specific core. The scheduler does its job better than you could, taking into account all the other processes not just yours. –  syam May 18 '13 at 15:45
    
Both of You are right. I've tested it with thread binding and without and it works better without –  user1978386 May 18 '13 at 15:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I don't have much experience with CUDA on CPU(Only used it with GPU), but normally threads are assigned to CPU cores by the OS. You can force a thread to run on a specified CPU Core but this is not recommended. The OS always knows best what core would be best to run a thread since it knows what other load is on the core outside your program.

For the second question, the HyperThreading concept works on the fact that a thread/process will have a lot of "downtime" while waiting for data from RAM and IO(Like harddrive, network etc.), in your case mostly RAM. While your thread is waiting for a read or write to complete, the core will switch to another thread. With HyperThreading this is really fast within certain parameters(Like within the same program code), and in IO and RAM heavy processes can make it seem like you really have 8 cores instead of 4. In your program you write to a variable from every running thread, so you would benefit greatly from actually running with 8 computing threads.

More info on HT: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyper-threading

Of course, the best thing to do Is simply test. Test with 4 threads, test with 8 threads. There is no definitive "correct" answer. It can be different from computer to computer.

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To add to @Wildex answer, a little trial with CPU-intensive tasks. 4/8 core i7:

8 tests,
8 tasks,
counting to 1000000,
using 4 threads:
Validated: 1000000 in 1248ms
Validated: 1000000 in 1388ms
Validated: 1000000 in 1404ms
Validated: 1000000 in 1248ms
Validated: 1000000 in 1279ms
Validated: 1000000 in 1389ms
Validated: 1000000 in 1310ms
Validated: 1000000 in 1482ms
Average time: 1343ms
Total validated: 8000000


8 tests,
8 tasks,
counting to 1000000,
using 8 threads:
Validated: 1000000 in 936ms
Validated: 1000000 in 904ms
Validated: 1000000 in 936ms
Validated: 1000000 in 921ms
Validated: 1000000 in 951ms
Validated: 1000000 in 968ms
Validated: 1000000 in 920ms
Validated: 1000000 in 920ms
Average time: 932ms
Total validated: 8000000
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