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I'm trying to code a program that prints the set of all words in an alphabet. This is mostly a test to get me used to strings and pointers in C. I have settled on a recursive solution, that I seem to be having trouble using pointers in strcat. Any suggestions why I'm getting segfaults here?

    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <stdlib.h>
    #include <string.h>

    #define DIM 26

    void print (char *);

    char alphabet[26] = {'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'i', 'j', 'k', 'l', 'm',
                     'n', 'o', 'p', 'q', 'r', 's', 't', 'u', 'v', 'w', 'x', 'y', 'z'};
    char word[26];


    int main(void) {
        *word = '\0';
        print(word);
        return EXIT_SUCCESS;
    }

    void print (char *word){
        for (int i = 0; i < DIM; ++i){
            strcat(word, alphabet[i]);
            printf("%c\n", word);
            print(*word);
        }
    }
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1  
strcat gets a string as the second argument, you are giving it a char. A proper compilation would have told you this. For example, try with -Wall in gcc. –  Shahbaz May 18 '13 at 15:57
1  
Do you realize how many words that would be? You might be printing awhile. –  Mark Tolonen May 18 '13 at 16:00
    
Your code doesn't compile for me. 1. strcat gets a string as the second argument, not a char. 2. print gets a string as argument, not a char. 3. %c in printf gets a char, not a string –  kotlomoy May 18 '13 at 16:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted
  • The second argument of strcat is a string. So you have to send a null-terminated array of char.
  • The %c format of printf indicates an int, but word is a pointer to char.
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My use of strcat, whilst clearly not the only problem in the code, was the thing I was having issues with. Thanks! –  shockstakovich May 19 '13 at 13:48

The deepest conceptual problem I think is that you have no base case. You're building an infinite recursion tree.

Try this:

   void print (char *word){
        if (strlen(word)<5){
             for (int i = 0; i < DIM; ++i){
               strcat(word, alphabet[i]);
               printf("%c\n", word);
               print(*word);
            }
        }
    }

There are other minor problems with your usage of C that a good compiler will pick up on. Turn on warnings and don't ignore them!

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Where would you suggest? I'm using emacs with -Wall to compile... –  shockstakovich May 19 '13 at 13:50

You need word to be 27 bytes long and set the last byte to zero.

Otherwise printf will overrun into memory you don't own; printf only terminates when it gets to a zero byte value.

Your print function also calls itself indefinitely. This will cause a stack overflow very quickly.

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Because 1. your buffer is too short (for 26 letters and the terminating 0, you need 27 bytes), 2. strcat() wants strings, you're feeding it a char, and 3. your function has infinite recursion, it never terminates.

Dummy iterative replacement solution: all subsets = variation with repetition, and there are 2 ^ n subsets:

char abc[26] = {
    'a', 'b', 'c', 'd',
    'e', 'f', 'g', 'h',
    'i', 'j', 'k', 'l',
    'm', 'n', 'o', 'p',
    'q', 'r', 's', 't',
    'u', 'v', 'w', 'x',
    'y', 'z'
};

for (long i = 0; i < (1 << 26); i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < 26; j++) {
        if ((i >> j) & 1) {
            fputc(abc[j], stdout);
        }
    }
    fputc('\n', stdout);
}

You're welcome.

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