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Could someone explain me, why my original constant LIST from the beginning is getting manipulated at the end? I thought constant could be just once initialized. I want to store the manipulations in a new array (new_list) without affecting the original one (LIST).

$ned = "foo"
$med = ""

print LIST = [:nrd, :mrd_y] # -> [:nrd, :mrd_y]


list = LIST

new_list = list.delete_if { |element|
  case element
  when :nrd then $ned.empty?
  when :mrd_y then $ned.empty? || $med.empty?
  end
}

print new_list # -> [:nrd]

print LIST # -> [:nrd] instead of [:nrd, :mrd_y]
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Array#delete_if -> Deletes every element of self for which block evaluates to true.

$ned = "foo"
$med = ""

LIST = [:nrd, :mrd_y]
p LIST.object_id #=> 84053120
list = LIST
p LIST.object_id #=> 84053120
new_list = list.delete_if { |element|
  case element
  when :nrd then $ned.empty?
  when :mrd_y then $ned.empty? || $med.empty?
  end
}

List and list holding the same Array object, as object_id tells above. Thus for each true evaluation from block delete_if deletes item from the object referenced by 84053120. Which is kept by the LIST and list. so you can use the below:

$ned = "foo"
$med = ""

LIST = [:nrd, :mrd_y] 
list = LIST
new_list = list.dup.delete_if { |element|
  case element
  when :nrd then $ned.empty?
  when :mrd_y then $ned.empty? || $med.empty?
  end
}

p new_list #=>[:nrd]
p LIST #=>[:nrd, :mrd_y]

Or (better approach use Array#reject),

$ned = "foo"
$med = ""

list = [:nrd, :mrd_y]  
new_list = list.reject { |element|
  case element
  when :nrd then $ned.empty?
  when :mrd_y then $ned.empty? || $med.empty?
  end
}
p new_list #=>[:nrd]
p list #=>[:nrd, :mrd_y]
share|improve this answer
    
You could also use reject if that makes the block's logic cleaner. I think the select or reject approaches would be what I'd expect to see in Ruby code. –  mu is too short May 18 '13 at 17:30
    
@muistooshort you are right! I for a while forgot about reject. Thanks for the pointer. updated now. –  Arup Rakshit May 18 '13 at 17:33
    
Thanks for your suggestions. in both case i wouldn't need the intermediate step list = LIST anymore, right (just LIST.reject)? –  ericMTR May 18 '13 at 17:41
    
@ericMTR yes you don't need to have.I would suggest you not to use constant rather use list only with reject. list = [:nrd, :mrd_y] use this and list.reject{... That's it. –  Arup Rakshit May 18 '13 at 17:44

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