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anybody have an idea what is happening with this i've got the code

console.log('cCP: '+chatCurrentPlace+' - key: '+key); 
if(key>chatCurrentPlace){chatCurrentPlace=key;} 
console.log('cCP: '+chatCurrentPlace+' - key: '+key);

and the console logs

cCP: 0 - key: 4 
cCP: 4 - key: 4 
cCP: 4 - key: 7 
cCP: 7 - key: 7 
cCP: 7 - key: 8 
cCP: 8 - key: 8 
cCP: 8 - key: 9 
cCP: 9 - key: 9 
cCP: 9 - key: 11 
cCP: 9 - key: 11 

why is the last one not working? it should be cCP: 11 - key: 11

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4  
Looks like you are comparing strings instead of numbers. "9">"11" is true. –  freakish May 18 '13 at 17:33
2  
I agree with @freakish . you can check typeof key –  Outsider May 18 '13 at 17:34
1  
Just to put it in more detail... when comparing strings it compares them character by character. So ("9" > "11") is actually (9 > 1). –  George Reith May 18 '13 at 17:35
    
i worked it out the last key was a string of 11 instead of a digit for some reason :-/ –  dt192 May 18 '13 at 17:36
    
ohhh they are all strings lol that makes sense ok thanks guys :-) i just made it (key>(chatCurrentPlace*1)) and all is well –  dt192 May 18 '13 at 17:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

One or both of your variables are probably strings, so are being compared as strings and no numbers. "9" > "11" for the same reason that "b" > "aa" (strings are compared character by character until the first index where they differ).

Convert the values to numbers in your test (e.g. with the Unary + Operator) :

if( +key > +chatCurrentPlace ){ chatCurrentPlace = key; } 

or the parseInt function:

if( parseInt(key, 10) > parseInt(chatCurrentPlace, 10) ){ chatCurrentPlace = key; } 

You may wish to convert the values before reaching the if so that they remain numbers throughout.

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thanks I didn't know you could convert to digit using + I normally use (something*1) but I prefer the + –  dt192 May 18 '13 at 17:49
    
IMHO both are ugly because they hide what they do too much, making the code harder to read. I prefer using Number(). Yes, it's a bit more to type, but good code is readable code, not short code. –  Ingo Bürk May 18 '13 at 21:53

Are you sure the key and cCP values are not taken as strings? It looks like they are sorted alphabetically, unlike numbers. Try

key = parseInt(key,10);

for both of the variables before comparing them.

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2  
Using parseInt (which needs a Upper Case I) without a radix is almost always a bad idea. –  Quentin May 18 '13 at 17:38
    
@Quentin Thanks, corrected. –  tarsis May 18 '13 at 19:30

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