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I'm teaching myself Python ahead of starting a new job. Its a Django job, so I have to stick to 2.7. As such, I'm reading Beginning Python by Hetland and don't understand his example of using slices to replicate list.extend() functionality.

First, he shows the extend method by

a = [1, 2, 3]
b = [4, 5, 6]
a.extend(b)

produces [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]

Next, he demonstrates extend by slicing via

a = [1, 2, 3]
b = [4, 5, 6]
a[len(a):] = b

which produces the exact same output as the first example.

How does this work? A has a length of 3, and the terminating slice index point is empty, signifying that it runs to the end of the list. How do the b values get added to a?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Python's slice-assignment syntax means "make this slice equal to this value, expanding or shrinking the list if necessary". To fully understand it you may want to try out some other slice values:

a = [1, 2, 3]
b = [4, 5, 6]

First, lets replace part of A with B:

a[1:2] = b
print(a) # prints [1, 4, 5, 6, 3]

Instead of replacing some values, you can add them by assigning to a zero-length slice:

a[1:1] = b
print(a) # prints [1, 4, 5, 6, 2, 3]

Any slice that is "out of bounds" instead simply addresses an empty area at one end of the list or the other (too large positive numbers will address the point just off the end while too large negative numbers will address the point just before the start):

a[200:300] = b
print(a) # prints [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]

Your example code simply uses the most "accurate" out of bounds slice at the end of the list. I don't think that is code you'd use deliberately for extending, but it might be useful as an edge case that you don't need to handle with special logic.

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It's simply an extension of normal indexing.

>>> L
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
>>> L[2] = 42
>>> L
[1, 2, 42, 4, 5]

The __setitem__() method detects that a slice is being used instead of a normal index and behaves appropriately.

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2  
I don't think this is very helpful. L[len(L)] = 6 isn't legal, but the slice equivalent, L[len(L):] = [6] is. –  Blckknght May 18 '13 at 18:02
1  
@Blckknght: Slices are never out of bounds. L = []; L[123456:] is not a problem. –  Martijn Pieters May 18 '13 at 18:03
    
@Blckknght: They also pass completely different types as the index to the method. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams May 18 '13 at 18:03
    
In my example, does it create a new list mapped to variable a? –  Jason May 18 '13 at 18:04
1  
@IgnacioVazquez-Abrams: Yes, the different type passed to __setitem__ is how Python detects slice assignment internally. But I think the question is about what assignment means when dealing with slices. Your answer doesn't say anything other than that it "behaves appropriately" which doesn't seem to helpful unless you already know all the slice assignment logic. Your example of a non-slice item assignment is simply a red herring. –  Blckknght May 18 '13 at 18:18
a = [1, 2, 3]
b = [4, 5, 6]
a[len(a):] = b

means element in a from position len(a) are elements in b. Which means extending a with b.

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For a demonstration, consider looking at a subclass of list:

from __future__ import print_function     # so I can run on Py 3 and Py 2

class EdList(list):
    def __setitem__(self,index,value):
        print('setitem: index={}, value={}'.format(index,value))
        list.__setitem__(self,index,value)    
        print(self)

    def __setslice__(self,i,j,seq):
        print('setslice: i:{}, j:{}, seq:{}'.format(i,j,seq))
        self.__setitem__(slice(i,j),seq)

Running on Python 3:

>>> a=EdList(range(10))
>>> a[300000:]=[1,2,3]
setitem: index=slice(300000, None, None), value=[1, 2, 3]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 1, 2, 3]
>>> a[1:1]=[4,5,6]
setitem: index=slice(1, 1, None), value=[4, 5, 6]
[0, 4, 5, 6, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 1, 2, 3]

Running on Python 2:

>>> a=EdList(range(10))
>>> a[300000:]=[1,2,3]
setslice: i:300000, j:9223372036854775807, seq:[1, 2, 3]
setitem: index=slice(300000, 9223372036854775807, None), value=[1, 2, 3]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 1, 2, 3]
>>> a[1:1]=[4,5,6]
setslice: i:1, j:1, seq:[4, 5, 6]
setitem: index=slice(1, 1, None), value=[4, 5, 6]
[0, 4, 5, 6, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 1, 2, 3]

It is confusing when you are first learning it, but you will learn to love it I think.

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