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how can I count how many zero bits are in variable? I must use macro like thist BITCOUNT(x,c) where x is my variable and c is count of zero bits in x

example: X = 00101001 and C = 5

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I fail to see why C is supplied. Please clarify. –  StoryTeller May 18 '13 at 19:17
    
Have you considered a parity table (which usually count the number of lit bits in an octet, so you'll likely have an inverse-parity table instead). –  WhozCraig May 18 '13 at 19:18
4  
#define BITCOUNT(x,c) (c) –  chris May 18 '13 at 19:19
    
@chris +1 nice. If c is indeed the number of zero-bits, (c) would be the right answer (though it begs the question where it came from in the first place. =P) –  WhozCraig May 18 '13 at 19:21
    
How about #define BITCOUNT(x,c) for(int i=0,c=0;c+=!(x&1),i<sizeof(c)*8;x=x>>1,++i){}? Just off the top of my head and don't have a compiler handy to test it with, so not posted as an answer. And of course it destroys x in the process. (And yes, it can be written so it doesn't destroy x - see if you can figure out how). Share and enjoy. –  Bob Jarvis May 18 '13 at 19:34

1 Answer 1

A simple solution:

#include <limits.h>

#define BITCOUNT(x,c) \
    { \
        int i; \
        (c) = 0; \
        for ( i = 0; i < CHAR_BIT * sizeof(x); i++ ) \
            (c) += ( (x) & ( 1 << i ) ) == 0; \
    }
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1  
Interesting, I never thought of c as an lvalue. –  chris May 18 '13 at 19:30
    
Well, c is supposed to have the number of zero bits. –  unxnut May 18 '13 at 19:31
2  
This could need the funky do-while, and the constant 8 could be CHAR_BIT * sizeof x. –  wildplasser May 18 '13 at 19:31
    
Thanks @wildplasser. This is why I am on stackoverflow. I just learned something. If you replace 8 with CHAR_BIT in the for statement, you also need to #include <limits.h> –  unxnut May 18 '13 at 19:37
    
You are correct about the <limits.h>. BTW: you still assume sizeof x == 1 –  wildplasser May 18 '13 at 19:39

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