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I'm trying (and failing) to write a simple function that checks whether a number is prime. The problem I'm having is that when I get to an if statement, it seems to be doing the same thing regardless of the input. This is the code I have:

def is_prime(x):
    if x >= 2:
        for i in range(2,x):
            if x % i != 0:    #if x / i remainder is anything other than 0
                print "1"
                break
            else:
                print "ok"
        else:
            print "2"
    else: print "3"

is_prime(13)

The line with the comment is where I'm sure the problem is. It prints "1" regardless of what integer I use as a parameter. I'm sorry for what is probably a stupid question, I'm not an experienced programmer at all.

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4  
You are mixing tabs and spaces in your post here. Make sure you don't in your actual file. Run the script with python -tt and correct any problems it reports. Preferably, configure your editor to use only spaces for indentation, following the PEP 8 styleguide recommendation. –  Martijn Pieters May 18 '13 at 22:10
    
whats the value of the variable i , on the if statement? –  scrineym May 18 '13 at 22:10
    
@MartijnPieters No I used only tabs in the actual code, I added the spaces to format the code correctly in my question. I tried running the script with python -tt and still only got a "1". –  Taint May 18 '13 at 22:14
    
@scrineym The i is supposed to be incrementing by 1 in the for loop, have I done something wrong? –  Taint May 18 '13 at 22:16
    
also there are three else statements in the code but only 2 if statements I'm not sure of the in's and outs of python but I'm not sure if that is possible ? –  scrineym May 18 '13 at 22:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your code is actually really close to being functional. You just have a logical error in your conditional.

There are some optimizations you can make for a primality test like only checking up until the square root of the given number.

def is_prime(x):
    if x >= 2:
        for i in range(2,x):
            if x % i == 0: # <----- You need to be checking if it IS evenly
                print "not prime" # divisible and break if so since it means
                break             # the number cannot be prime
            else:
                print "ok"
        else:
            print "prime"
    else:
        print "not prime"
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+1 for pointing out the square root optimization. –  Daniel Roseman May 18 '13 at 22:25
    
Thank you very much. I fixed the conditional but now it's telling me every number is prime, so what is wrong here? Edit: can't format the code properly, but all I did was change the conditional to if x % i == 0: and delete the else statement for the conditional. –  Taint May 18 '13 at 22:29
    
Try copying the code exactly. It should work. –  Jared May 18 '13 at 22:30

Try using return statements instead of (or in addition to) print statements, eg:

from math import sqrt # for a smaller range

def is_prime(x):
    if x <= 2:
        return True
    for i in range(2, int(sqrt(x)) + 1):
        if x % i == 0:
            print "%d is divisible by %d" % (x,i)
            return False
    return True    

is_prime(13)
True

is_prime(14)
14 is divisible by 2
False
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format() is the right way for string formatting. –  Elazar May 18 '13 at 22:31

This kind of checks can be single expression:

def is_prime(n):
    return n>1 and all(n%k for k in range(2,n//2))
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The problem is this line:

if x % i != 0: 

You are testing if x % i is not 0, which is true for any pair of integers that are relatively prime (hence, you always get it printed out)

It should be:

if x % i == 0:
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