Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been working on a few projects that have required me to do a lot of list subsetting and while profiling code I realised that the object[["nameHere"]] approach to subsetting lists was usually faster than the object$nameHere approach.

As an example if we create a list with named components:

a.long.list <- as.list(rep(1:1000))
names(a.long.list) <- paste0("something",1:1000)

Why is this:

system.time (
for (i in 1:10000) {
    a.long.list[["something997"]]
}
)


user  system elapsed 
0.15    0.00    0.16 

faster than this:

system.time (
    for (i in 1:10000) {
        a.long.list$something997
    }
)

user  system elapsed 
0.23    0.00    0.23 

My question is simply whether this behaviour is true universally and I should avoid the $ subset wherever possible or does the most efficient choice depend on some other factors?

share|improve this question
9  
+1. I suspect it's related to partial matching with the $ sign. Suppose you have my_list <- list("a" = 1, "ace" = 2). If you try my_list$ac it gets ace, but if you try my_list[["ac"]], it finds nothing. –  Frank May 18 '13 at 23:48
5  
not ruling out the partial matching theory, but what I hope a complete answer will include is why adding exact = FALSE to [[ in the OP's example does not degrade the performance. –  flodel May 19 '13 at 11:48
7  
Seems worth mentioning that $ and [[ are implemented by two entirely different C functions (both in src/main/subset.c). For $, the relevant function is do_subset3 which in turn calls R_subset3_dflt. [[ uses another function, do_subset2, which in turn calls do_subset2_dflt. –  Josh O'Brien May 19 '13 at 17:23
5  
The comment preceding do_subset2 notes simply: "The [[ subset operator. It needs to be fast." –  Josh O'Brien May 19 '13 at 17:25
2  
Also probably worth mentioning one of the newest changes in R 3.0.0: "Partial matching when using the $ operator on data frames now throws a warning and may become defunct in the future. If partial matching is intended, replace foo$bar by foo[["bar", exact = FALSE]]." –  zap2008 May 21 '13 at 2:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Function [[ first goes through all elements trying for exact match, then tries to do partial match. The $ function tries both exact and partial match on each element in turn. If you execute:

system.time (
    for (i in 1:10000) {
     a.long.list[["something9973", exact=FALSE]]
     }
)

i.e., you are running a partial match where there is no exact match, you will find that $ is in fact ever so slightly faster.

share|improve this answer
    
I think this answers Flodel's clarifying question about why adding exact = FALSE doesn't degrade performance. Anyway I'm now convinced that in programming contexts where speed matters it is going to be better to use [[ unless there is a high probability of needing partial matching (which more often creates bugs in my programs than solves problems). –  Jon M May 29 '13 at 21:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.