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I am doing a Unix, C assignment. I am creating a Server and a Client which will interact with each other. I am not very experienced with TCP/IP programming so I apologize for being slow in advance.

First, I am trying to create a basic layout of my set up. I compile the Client and Server using a Makefile and it works perfectly. However, when I execute the Server, I get this error:

shmget: Invalid argument

I think it is a problem with IPC resources. I am supposed to remove the IPC resources using atexit() but I don't think I am doing it right.

Here is the code for server.c if it helps:

#include "server.h"

int shmid, semid;
struct Shared *shm;

int main() {
    key_t shmkey = 0x6060, semkey = 0x6061;
    char *s, c;
    unsigned short zeros[2] = {0, 0};

    int srvrFd, clntFd, clntAdrLen, i; //socket
    struct sockaddr_in srvrAddr, clntAddr;
    char buf[256];

    if(atexit(server_exit) != 0) {
            perror("failed to attach atexit()");
            _exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }
    /* Create an array of 2 semaphores with key. */
    semid = semget(semkey, 2, 0666 | IPC_CREAT);
    if (semid < 0) {
            perror("semget");
            exit(0);
    }
    /* Set the values of semaphores */
    argument.array = zeros;
    if (semctl(semid, 0, SETALL, argument) < 0) {
            printf("Cannot init semaphore 0.\n");
    }

    /* Create the segment. */
    if ((shmid=shmget(shmkey, sizeof(struct Shared), IPC_CREAT|0666))<0) {
            perror("shmget");
            exit(1);
    }

    /* Attach the segment to our data space. */
    if ((shm=shmat(shmid, NULL, 0))==(struct Shared *)-1) {
            perror("shmat");
            exit(1);
    }
    /* Put some things into the shared memory. */
    s = shm->text;
    for (c = 'a'; c<= 'z'; c++) {
            *s++ = c;
    }
    *s = '\0';
    shm->number = 123;

    //socket
    srvrFd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
    if(srvrFd < 0) {
            perror("socket");
            exit(1);
    }
    srvrAddr.sin_addr.s_addr = htonl(INADDR_ANY);
    srvrAddr.sin_port = htons(6060);
    if(bind(srvrFd, (struct sockaddr *)&srvrAddr, sizeof(srvrAddr)) < 0) {
            perror("bind");
            exit(1);
    }
    listen(srvrFd, 5);
    while(1) {
            clntAdrLen = sizeof(clntAddr);
            clntFd = accept(srvrFd, (struct sockaddr*)&clntAddr, NULL);
            if (fork() == 0) { //we're in the child
                    i = recv(clntFd, buf, sizeof buf, 0);
                    send(clntFd, buf, i, 0);
                    close(clntFd);
                    exit(0);
            } else { //we're in the parent
                    close(clntFd);
            }
    }
}

void server_exit(void)
{
    if(shm != NULL) {
            shmdt(shm);
    }
    if(semid != -1) {
            semctl(semid, 0, IPC_RMID);
    }
    if(shmid != -1) {
            shmctl(shmid, IPC_RMID, 0);
    }
}

Thanks for reading.

Edit: Definition of structure..

struct Shared {
    char text[27];
    int number;
} ;
share|improve this question
    
why are you trying to use shared memory? You talked about using TCP and IPC, but what's the intent for the shared memory? Also, where does the string "Invalid Argument" come from? –  xaxxon May 19 '13 at 0:17
    
I am going to use it later for the rest of the assignment. I just wanted to get it up and running first. –  Lily Banks May 19 '13 at 0:19
    
You have to tell us where "Invalid Argument" came from –  xaxxon May 19 '13 at 0:49
    
I'm guessing that's the call to perror –  xaxxon May 19 '13 at 1:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

http://linux.die.net/man/2/shmget

Looks like either the segment exists and it's smaller than what you asked for, or you're trying to create a new one, but it's smaller than the system min size (SHMMIN) or greater than max (SHMMAX)

EDIT: Turns out this was it -- it already existed and was smaller than what you were asking for. You must have created it as a size 27, 28, 29, 30, or 31, since it works for 27 but not 32. If you run the unix command line program ipcs, it will show you all your existing shared memory segments:

key        shmid      owner      perms      bytes      nattch     status      
0x00000001 0          ec2-user   666        32         0                       

Then ipcrm -M <key> will delete it.

From what I'm seeing, you likely don't want to use SYS-V shared memory. Use POSIX if you can. Here is a reference for the POSIX Shared Memory interface:

http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man7/shm_overview.7.html

also check out:

http://www.cs.cf.ac.uk/Dave/C/node27.html

for a guide to both, but I'd prefer POSIX if it's available (and it will be unless you're on a really old system like DEC Alpha)

share|improve this answer
    
How do I know which one it is and how can I fix it? –  Lily Banks May 19 '13 at 0:31
    
printf("%d %d %d\n", SHMMIN, SHMMAX, sizeof(struct Shared)); <== what does that print on your system? I'm guessing the struct is smaller than the min size –  xaxxon May 19 '13 at 1:05
    
When I run that statement, it says that SHMMIN/SHMMAX are undeclared. But, the size of the structure is 32. I read the second link you provided and on the sample, SHMSZ is defined as 27. Which is less than 32. However, using SHMSZ instead of the strucure somehow works. But, now I get bind: Address already in use which I assume is a different problem. –  Lily Banks May 19 '13 at 1:23
    
yes, that's a TCP problem –  xaxxon May 19 '13 at 1:35
    
it really doesn't make any sense to me that 27 is valid but 32 is not. Did you actually do the printf("%d\n", sizeof(struct Shared)); ? Did that print 32? Can you add the struct definition to your question? –  xaxxon May 19 '13 at 1:38

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