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I can't find the break in logic here but when run I get an output of 3125 as for what was supposed to be the largest prime factor. 3125 is obviously not prime nor even the largest non-prime factor. This is not designed to be an efficient method to find prime factors, just trying to figure this out.

long long modulo= 99999;
long long LrgPrimeFactor=0;
long long currentfactor=0;
long long tempmodulo=0;
int break1 =0;
int break2 =0;

while (modulo>0&&break2==0)
{
    if ((100000%modulo) ==0)
    {
        currentfactor=modulo;

        for (tempmodulo=currentfactor-1;tempmodulo>0;tempmodulo--)
        {
            if (currentfactor%tempmodulo==0)
            {
                LrgPFactor=currentfactor;
                break1=1;
                break;
            }
            else if(break1==1)
            {
                break2=1;
                break;
            }
        }
    }
    else 
    {
        modulo-=2;
    }
}
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closed as too broad by Jonathan Leffler, Shafik Yaghmour, Tom Fenech, Kerrek SB, ugoren Apr 9 '14 at 12:06

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I'm confused at what the for loop is even supposed to do. Can you explain it? –  FDinoff May 19 '13 at 1:32
    
@FDinoff It was supposed to check if the factor of the original number (100000 in this case) is prime or not. Now that you mentioned it it seems that it obviously does not do that. –  0x41414141 May 19 '13 at 1:37
1  
Which number are you trying to find the largest prime factor of? 100000? Why isn't that a paremeter to the function? How are you generating prime numbers? There isn't a readily recognizable loop that generates them in the code. Shouldn't you be stepping through the prime numbers, dividing the value by any prime factors until you get an answer that's prime? (So, if the number was 60, you divide by 2 leaving 30, then divide by 2 leaving 15, then divide by 3 leaving 5, then you divide by 5 leaving 1 which means 5 was the largest prime factor.) –  Jonathan Leffler May 19 '13 at 1:37
1  
More descriptive variable names would help a lot. –  John May 19 '13 at 1:38
1  
@JonathanLeffler Yes but 2 is the only one as I understand –  0x41414141 May 19 '13 at 1:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I made some changes to your code, and it now gives the correct result. Hope this helps.

long long modulo = 99999;
long long lrgPFactor = 0;
long long currentfactor = 0;
long long tempmodulo = 0;

while (modulo > 0)
{
    if (100000 % modulo == 0)
    {
        for (tempmodulo = modulo - 1; tempmodulo > 1; --tempmodulo)
        {
            if (modulo % tempmodulo == 0)
                break;
        }
        if (tempmodulo == 1)
        {
            lrgPFactor = modulo;
            break;
        }
    }
    modulo -= 2;
}
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+1 for modding the OP's code rather than starting from scratch. I couldn't quite see where to change it, but you did. –  John May 19 '13 at 2:49

Here's how I would code it if I were to use your method, which is to start at one less than the number you want to factor and work down. I verified that this works in CodePad.org.

#include <stdio.h>

int main() 
{
    int numberToFactor = 100000;
    int largestPrimeFactorCandidate = numberToFactor;
    int testDivisor = 0;
    int stillLookingForPrime = 1;
    int stillCheckingPrimeness = 1;

    while (largestPrimeFactorCandidate >= 1 && stillLookingForPrime)
    {
        if (numberToFactor != largestPrimeFactorCandidate)
        {
            // First we need a factor of the number.  The first time
            // around, though, we skip this, because the number itself
            // could be prime.

            while (numberToFactor % largestPrimeFactorCandidate != 0)
            {
                largestPrimeFactorCandidate--;
            }
        }

        // Now that we have a factor, we check to see if it's prime.

        testDivisor = largestPrimeFactorCandidate - 1;
        stillCheckingPrimeness = 1;

        while (stillCheckingPrimeness)
        {
            if (largestPrimeFactorCandidate % testDivisor != 0)
            {
                testDivisor--;
            }
            else
            {
                stillCheckingPrimeness = 0;
            }
        }

        if (testDivisor != 1)
        {
            // It's not prime, so we keep looking.
            largestPrimeFactorCandidate--;
        }
        else
        {
            // Largest factor besides itself is 1, so it's prime.
            stillLookingForPrime = 0;
        }
    }

    printf("%d", largestPrimeFactorCandidate);

    // At this point, largestPrimeFactorCandidate is 5, which is your answer.

    return 0;
}
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I think you should start from 2 and work upwards, rather than from N downwards. This code implements the algorithm outlined in the commentary (badly outlined in the commentary):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <inttypes.h>

typedef unsigned long long Number;

#define PRI_uNumber "llu"

static Number largest_prime_factor(Number n)
{
    if (n <= 1)
        return n;
    while (n % 2 == 0)
    {
        n /= 2;
        if (n == 1)
            return 2;
    }

    /* When f is composite, its factors have already been eliminated from n */
    for (Number f = 3; f < n; f += 2)
    {
        while (n % f == 0)
        {
            n /= f;
            if (n == 1)
                return f;
        }
    }
    return n;
}

int main(void)
{
    Number numbers[] =
    {
        1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13,
        15, 19, 21, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99,
        100, 101, 102, 103, 100000, 100001, 100003, 100007, 100009,
    };

    for (size_t i = 0; i < sizeof(numbers) / sizeof(numbers[0]); i++)
        printf("%6" PRI_uNumber ": LPF = %" PRI_uNumber "\n",
                numbers[i], largest_prime_factor(numbers[i]));

    return 0;
}

Output:

     1: LPF = 1
     2: LPF = 2
     3: LPF = 3
     4: LPF = 2
     5: LPF = 5
     6: LPF = 3
     7: LPF = 7
     8: LPF = 2
     9: LPF = 3
    10: LPF = 5
    11: LPF = 11
    12: LPF = 3
    13: LPF = 13
    15: LPF = 5
    19: LPF = 19
    21: LPF = 7
    90: LPF = 5
    91: LPF = 13
    92: LPF = 23
    93: LPF = 31
    94: LPF = 47
    95: LPF = 19
    96: LPF = 3
    97: LPF = 97
    98: LPF = 7
    99: LPF = 11
   100: LPF = 5
   101: LPF = 101
   102: LPF = 17
   103: LPF = 103
100000: LPF = 5
100001: LPF = 9091
100003: LPF = 100003
100007: LPF = 1031
100009: LPF = 157

Note that PRI_uNumber carefully avoids the namespace reserved to the <inttypes.h> header:

7.31.5 Format conversion of integer types <inttypes.h>

¶1 Macros that begin with either PRI or SCN, and either a lowercase letter or X may be added to the macros defined in the <inttypes.h> header.

The underscore means that it is safe.

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1  
+1 Nice analysis. –  John May 19 '13 at 3:12

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