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This code I wrote is supposed to read a sentence and a character the check the occurency of that character in that sentence. It works when I write the code in the main, but when I try to use a function it doesn't work. The problem I have is declaring a string and a variable char to the function arguments. What is wrong?

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>
int occ(char*,char);
int main ()
{
    char c,s[50];
    printf("enter a sentece:\n");gets(s);
    printf("enter a letter: ");scanf("%c",&c);
    printf("'%c' is repeated %d times in your sentence.\n",c,occ(s,c));
}
int occ(s,c)
{
    int i=0,j=0;
    while(s[i]!='\0')
    {
        if(s[i]==c)j++;
        i++;
    }
    return j;
}
share|improve this question
    
and apart from the answers you got from others a time avoid using gets(s); as much as possible , see bugs section for this man page for more information linux.die.net/man/3/gets – kkk May 19 '13 at 6:36

Note that you should be getting a warning about a prototype mismatch between the declaration of occ and its definition, amongst a host of other compilation warnings.

When you write:

int occ(s,c)
{

you are using a pre-standard or K&R style function, and the default types of the arguments — since you didn't specify any type — is int. That's OK for the char parameter; it is not OK for the char * parameter.

So, all else apart, you should write:

int occ(char *s, char c)
{

to agree with the prototype.

When I compile your code, I get the compilation errors:

$ gcc -O3 -g -std=c99 -Wall -Wextra -Wmissing-prototypes -Wstrict-prototypes -Wold-style-definition -c wn.c
wn.c:4:5: warning: function declaration isn’t a prototype [-Wstrict-prototypes]
wn.c: In function ‘main’:
wn.c:4:5: warning: old-style function definition [-Wold-style-definition]
wn.c: In function ‘occ’:
wn.c:11:5: warning: old-style function definition [-Wold-style-definition]
wn.c:11:5: warning: type of ‘s’ defaults to ‘int’ [enabled by default]
wn.c:11:5: warning: type of ‘c’ defaults to ‘int’ [enabled by default]
wn.c:11:5: error: argument ‘s’ doesn’t match prototype
wn.c:3:5: error: prototype declaration
wn.c:11:5: error: argument ‘c’ doesn’t match prototype
wn.c:3:5: error: prototype declaration
wn.c:14:12: error: subscripted value is neither array nor pointer nor vector
wn.c:16:13: error: subscripted value is neither array nor pointer nor vector
wn.c:11:5: warning: parameter ‘s’ set but not used [-Wunused-but-set-parameter]

Note: it doesn't take much to fix the code — this compiles cleanly. It does, however, use fgets() and not gets(). You should forget that gets() exists now, and your teacher should be sacked for mentioning its existence.

Example run:

$ ./wn
enter a sentence: amanaplanacanalpanama
enter a letter: a
'a' is repeated 10 times in your sentence.
$

Code:

#include <stdio.h>

int occ(char*, char);

int main(void)
{
    char c, s[50];
    printf("enter a sentence: ");
    fgets(s, sizeof(s), stdin);
    printf("enter a letter: ");
    scanf("%c", &c);
    printf("'%c' is repeated %d times in your sentence.\n", c, occ(s, c));
    return 0;
}

int occ(char *s, char c)
{
    int i=0, j=0;
    while (s[i]!='\0')
    {
        if (s[i]==c)
            j++;
        i++;
    }
    return j;
}

The code should check that both fgets() and scanf() were successful; I got to be lazy.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you @Jonathan Leffler – Johnny Cash May 19 '13 at 3:10

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