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I'm working on a program that separates words in a string, and then prints each word on a different line. I am having some difficulty with the output. For ex.

"This is a string"

prints

""this 
"is"  
"a" 
"string" 
"

instead of

"this"
"is"
"a" 
"string"

Code:

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

void wholestring(char S[]) {
   int i;
   for (i=0; i<strlen(S); ++i) {
      }
   return;
}

int main(){
    const int mysize = 100;
    char mystr[mysize];
    char *newstr;

    fgets(mystr, mysize, stdin);
    wholestring(mystr);

    newstr = strtok (mystr, " ");

    while (newstr != '\0'){
        printf ("\"%s\" \n", newstr);
        newstr = strtok ('\0', " ");
    }
    return 0;
}
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3  
You are using '\0' instead of the usual NULL (not likely to be a problem, but very confusing). –  n.m. May 19 '13 at 5:34
    
Is the input always guaranteed to have the double quotes at the beginnning and end of the string? Also, what is wholestring supposed to do? –  xagyg May 19 '13 at 5:39
2  
Since you're using strtok(), you could specify " \"\n" (blank, double quote, newline) as the delimiter string to strtok() to eliminate the newline and the double quotes without much fuss. –  Jonathan Leffler May 19 '13 at 5:58
    
@JonathanLeffler Thank you, almost got it now. Just have one quotation on a new line that I'm trying to remove. –  Ace May 19 '13 at 6:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

there are two problems i am seeing in your code

newstr = strtok (mystr, " ");

this will have its issues if your input is within quotes for example like "this is a string"

instead of

this is a string

the

""this  <-- Here
"is"  
"a" 
"string" 
"

is because of the input within quotes ""

this can be cleared with

newstr = strtok (mystr, "\"| ");

the other is with the next line character at the end of your buffer needs to be cleared with NULL, other wise you are bound to get exitra newlines or quotes as in here

""this

"is"

"a"

"string"

" <-- Here 

sorry for incomplete answer

fgets(mystr, mysize, stdin);
wholestring(mystr);

/** ensure Next line is no more available **/
 if(mystr[strlen(mystr)-1] == '\n')
     mystr[strlen(mystr)-1] = '\0';

    newstr = strtok (mystr, "\"| ");
share|improve this answer
    
I'm stuck on getting rid of the new line and quote. I tried this, but it didn't work: if (mystr[strlen(mystr)-1]=='"') mystr[strlen(mystr)-1]==NULL; –  Ace May 19 '13 at 7:24
1  
(mystr[strlen(mystr)-1]=='"') you should look for '\n' i believe –  Uday May 19 '13 at 7:54
    
Why the pipe | in the strtok() delimiters? It is unwanted on the current specification of the problem. –  Jonathan Leffler May 19 '13 at 16:03

Xagyg is right about removing quotes from the source string; just remove the quotes from it. What's happening is the starting quote is being grouped with the first word because it's before the first space, so you get the " from the string and the " from the printf. You have the same problem on "string". The first " after string is the " from the file you read in. Then, you get the newline from the string you read in which takes the cursor down to the next line, then you get the " from the printf.

To solve this, you'll need to both remove the quotes from the original string as well as either not have a newline at the end of your source file (can only deal with one-line source files because fgets needs newlines to separate lines) or strip any newline characters from your string after you read it in like this:

int mystr_length = strlen(mystr);
for (int i = mystr_length-1; i >= 0 && (mystr[i] == '\r' || mystr[i] == '\n'); i--) {
    mystr[i]='\0';
}

Also, newstr is a pointer, so you should compare it against the NULL pointer "NULL" not the NUL ascii character "\0". Same thing with your first parameter to strtok. It wants NULL not NUL.

Is it possible you have a space at the end of your string which is getting you that last strtok response?

Here's what you do, instead of reading the string from a file, start with a string hard-coded into your program.

Also, print out the string you read, before you start parsing it, so you know it looks like you want it to.

Lastly, your "whole_string" function has a BIG problem. For each character in the string, it is recomputing the length of the string, which requires it to look at every character in the string. For really long strings, that can take a VERY long time. Instead, cache the length into a variable before the loop and use that

int string_length = strlen(S);
for (i=0; i<string_length; ++i) {

Also, that function, as stated in this question, doesn't actually do anything except really inefficiently do nothing through the string.

I used to have this at the top, but it's all wrong: You're capturing newline data and then printing it. It prints a quote, the cursor gets sent to the beginning of that same line and then the other quote is printed on top of it, which is why you only see one on your last line.

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Remove the first and last double quote of mystr before you start using the tokenizer (strtok). Or tokenize a copy of it without the enclosing quotes.

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Two minor variants of the code that produce the correct output.

Variant A

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    char line[4096];

    if (fgets(line, sizeof(line), stdin) != 0)
    {
        static const char delims[] = " \"\n";
        char *token = strtok(line, delims);

        while (token != NULL)
        {
            printf("\"%s\"\n", token);
            token = strtok(NULL, delims);
        }
    }
    return 0;
}

This avoids the use of a variable length array. In C, the const int mysize = 100; and char mystr[mysize]; create a VLA because mysize is not a compile-time constant expression. C++ would create a regular array. The difference is largely immaterial, but it does tell me you're using a C99 compiler (or a C++ compiler).

There's really no benefit to the constant mysize though; you should be using sizeof(mystr) in the call to fgets(), and then mysize is only referenced once, so it may as well be replaced with a constant — and I habitually use 4096 for a single line of input because it is fairly unlikely that anything except a bookmarks file will be a single line that's long than that.

Using the variable delims means that the string is not repeated; there's just one line to change if the delimiters change.

I also renamed the variables; the 'my' prefix always seems to me like 'baby talk' and never appears in my code.

Note that the code deals correctly with EOF or other I/O errors on the call to fgets(). It is never too soon to get into the habit of checking the return status of every input function! I'm as lazy as the rest when checking output functions like printf(), but input functions really matter.

I also eliminated the trailing blank on the output lines; those really annoy me — as do trailing blanks in code anywhere.

Also note that although '\0' is a null pointer constant, it is not a conventional way of writing it and will lead to (minor) confusion and then excoriation of the programmer who misuses '\0'. Use NULL or 0 for null pointers; use '\0' for characters specifically.

Variant B

There's a glaring repeat in the Variant A code; there are two calls to the strtok() function, but we could write the code so there is only one call to it, leading to:

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    char line[4096];

    if (fgets(line, sizeof(line), stdin) != 0)
    {
        char *token;
        for (char *source = line; (token = strtok(source, " \n\"")) != NULL; source = NULL)
            printf("\"%s\"\n", token);
    }
    return 0;
}

Since there's only one call to strtok() now, there's only one reference to the delimiters, so they can be a literal string again. The for loop line is a bit long (91 chars) mainly because the variable names are long. Using src and tok (and 0 for NULL) would reduce it under 80 characters without materially damaging the readability.

Both variants tokenize the input line:

"this is a string"

into the output:

"this"
"is"
"a"
"string"
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