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I created table

SQL>CREATE TABLE Student
(
StudID         NUMBER(6),
StudName       VARCHAR2(25),
JoinDate       DATE
);   
Table created.

SQL>INSERT INTO Student
VALUES (123,'JOHN',SYSDATE);
1 row created.

SQL>DELETE Student;
1 row deleted.

How can I get back the row ? If I use

SQL>ROLLBACK;
Rollback complete.

But after that

SQL>SELECT * FROM Student;
no rows selected.

Why is this coming?

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1 Answer 1

ROLLBACK tells Oracle to roll back the entire transaction. In your case, both the INSERT and the DELETE are part of the same transaction so the ROLLBACK reverses both operations. That returns the database to the state it was in immediately following the CREATE TABLE statement.

Some alternatives:

  1. If you were to issue a COMMIT after the INSERT then the DELETE statement would be in a separate transaction and the ROLLBACK would reverse only the effect of the DELETE statement.
  2. You could also create a savepoint after running the INSERT statement and then rollback to that savepoint after the DELETE rather than rolling back the entire transaction.
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Instead of SQL> DELETE Student; I used SQL> DELETE FROM Student –  bibhudash May 19 '13 at 11:46
    
WHERE StudID = 123; –  bibhudash May 19 '13 at 11:47
    
1 row deleted. Then used ROLLBACK; and then SELECT * FROM Student; and it works. –  bibhudash May 19 '13 at 11:48
    
Sorry this is not working. –  bibhudash May 20 '13 at 2:54
    
@bibhudash - What is not working? Everything you have posted appears to be working as it is supposed to. If that is not the behavior you want, you'll need to change your code. That's why I gave you a couple of different options for how to change your code. –  Justin Cave May 20 '13 at 4:13

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