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I have several lists that contain both strings and floats as their elements.

import numpy as num

COLUMN_1 = ['KIC 7742534', 'Variable Star of RR Lyr type' , 'V* V368 Lyr',
        'KIC 7742534', '4.0', '0.4564816']

COLUMN_2 = ['KIC 76', 'Variable Star' , 'V* V33 Lyr',
        'KIC 76', '5.0', '0.45']

DAT = num.column_stack((COLUMN_1, COLUMN_2))
num.savetxt('SAVETXT.txt', DAT, delimiter=' ', fmt='{:^10}'.format('%s'))

The output I get when running this file is the following:

KIC 7742534    ,    KIC 76    
Variable Star of RR Lyr type    ,    Variable Star    
V* V368 Lyr    ,    V* V33 Lyr    
KIC 7742534    ,    KIC 76    
4.0    ,    5.0    
0.4564816    ,    0.45     

The ideal output would look like this (including an aligned header)

#ELEMENT1                            ELEMENT2
KIC 7742534                     ,    KIC 76    
Variable Star of RR Lyr type    ,    Variable Star    
V* V368 Lyr                     ,    V* V33 Lyr    
KIC 7742534                     ,    KIC 76    
4.0                             ,    5.0    
0.4564816                       ,    0.45   

How could I get an output like this (with aligned header), if the strings don't have a max width defined. I have tried modifying the format of the strings (fmt), but no luck so far.

-Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You will need to calculate the maximum string length of of the longest row of your output (or input depending on how you look at it), which a method similar to

max_len = max(max(map(len,l)) for l in zip(COLUMN_1,COLUMN_2))

Will achieve. After that you need to change the fmt parameters dynamically based on the value of max_len which you can do like so:

fmt=('{:^%d}' % max_len).format('%s')

The following non-numpy example shows the expected output:

with open('ofile.txt','w+') as f:
    max_len = max(max(map(len,l)) for l in zip(COLUMN_1,COLUMN_2))
    for line in zip(COLUMN_1,COLUMN_2):
        f.write(','.join(('{:<%s}' % (max_len)).format(e) for e in line)+'\n')

Produces a text file ofile.txt containing:

KIC 7742534                 ,KIC 76                      
Variable Star of RR Lyr type,Variable Star               
V* V368 Lyr                 ,V* V33 Lyr                  
KIC 7742534                 ,KIC 76                      
4.0                         ,5.0                         
0.4564816                   ,0.45          
share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly what I was looking for! Thanks @HennyH –  Victor May 19 '13 at 9:01
    
You don't need to manually chain formatting methods together like this; just use nested formats. For example, '{1:^{0}}'.format('%s', max_len). And even if you do want to manually chain them, why alternate between %-formatting and {}-formatting like this? (This is really more a question for the OP than the answerer, since you're just following his example. But you did take it one step farther, alternating yet again, so…) –  abarnert May 23 '13 at 22:54
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