Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a registration page that allows users to insert a password. I hash the password upon registration so that it is stored more securely in the database.

When the user logs in with the same password, the two hashes don't match and the user cannot log in.

This is my first time using a hash and it didn't behave as I expected:

This is the hashing code on the registration page:

$salt ="";     
function cryptPass($input, $rounds = 9)
{
    $salt = "";
    $saltChars = array_merge(range('A','Z'), range('a','z'), range('0','9'));
    for($i = 0; $i<22; $i++)
    {
        $salt  .=$saltChars[array_rand($saltChars)]; 
    }
    return crypt($input, sprintf('$2y$%02d$test$', $rounds) . $salt);
}
$hashedpass = cryptPass($pass1);      
echo $hashedpass;
//************Insert all the members's input to the database**************************//
      $query = mysql_query("INSERT INTO members(user_name, first_name, last_name, governorate, district, village, birth_date, email_address, specialization, password, salt, registered_date )VALUES('$username', '$firstname', '$lastname', '$governorate', '$district', '$village', '$bdate', '$email', '$specialization', '$hashedpass', '$salt',  now())")or die(mysql_error());    

i did add salt but it give empty

This is the hashing code on the login page

function cryptPass($input, $rounds = 9)
{
    $salt = "";
    $saltChars = array_merge(range('A','Z'), range('a','z'), range('0','9'));
    for($i = 0; $i<22; $i++)
    {
        $salt  .=$saltChars[array_rand($saltChars)]; 
    }
    return crypt($input, sprintf('$2y$%02d$test$', $rounds) . $salt);
}
$hashedpass = cryptPass($pass);   
echo $hashedpass;


$sql=mysql_query( "SELECT user_id, email_address, first_name, user_name FROM members WHERE email_address='$email'AND password= '$hashedpass' LIMIT 1") or die("error in members table");
$login_check = mysql_num_rows($sql);

  if($login_check > 0)the hashing password = $2y$09$test$4ZGgCiXdKzgQvuzwu.AxfdWvZadDCE.LD6HCkrK3ZsqJeN7e 
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Gumbo, deceze, hjpotter92, Eelke, Maerlyn May 19 '13 at 16:33

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4 Answers 4

When the user registers you need to store both the salt and the hashed password in your database. When the user tries to log in you need to use the same salt as when they registered, otherwise the hash will be different. This is called a per-user salt and is the more secure option.

A simpler, though less-secure option would be to generate a single salt value for the application and use it for all users. This will have the effect of keeping all the passwords hashed in the database but is much less secure because if that salt value is compromised it's a trivial matter to brute-force the hashed passwords.

share|improve this answer

You need to store the salt in the database, together with the hashed password.

When the user tries to login, you need to get the salt from the database, and hash the user input with it, to compare it against the hashed password.

In your example, you're generating a random salt in the login procedure which will never produce the same hash as you have in your database.

share|improve this answer
    
so in my example what it should be the code because it did not workk as it should –  user2398286 May 19 '13 at 7:47
    
When the user registers, you generate a salt, and hash the password with it. Then you save both of the passwords in to your database. When the users tries to log in, the first thing you do, is getting the salt of the user. Once you have his salt, you can hash the password entered by the user with the salt from the database. Then you can compare the generated hash with the hash in your database. –  Ahatius May 19 '13 at 7:53
    
the problem is i do not understand what you mean by getting the salt of the user (in the code i do not know what to write) –  user2398286 May 19 '13 at 7:56
    
Do you have a database? –  Ahatius May 19 '13 at 7:57
    
yes members table contain email and password with other fields –  user2398286 May 19 '13 at 8:00

If you're going to write it yourself, you need to store the generated salts in the DB (as the other responders said). More generally, I would try to delegate as much as possible to an outside library that provides password support out of the box. Getting crypto right is hard, and you really need to read up a bit more before you start rolling it yourself. There's good library support out there. You should use it.

Also, you really shouldn't be using MD5 to hash the passwords. Use bcrypt, pbkdf2, or another hash suitable for passwords. Just use a library.

share|improve this answer

Password salting works by appending a pre-defined random set of plaintext to a password before hashing it. This avoids having two identical hashes for two users having chosen the same password. Imagine two users of your system, user1 and user2, choosing 'letmein' as a password:

salt_user1 = 'awoidjalskdm'   
hash = MD5('letmein'+salt_user1) = ab82a9c495e3fe88d1986176e4850b1d

and for user2

salt_user2 = 'duiesnblekfn'
hash = MD5('letmein'+salt_user2) = 69caac44b5ee9f8b6468b5625000723a

Assuming your database structure is something along the lines of username:salt:password_hash, you would have this:

user1:awoidjalskdm:ab82a9c495e3fe88d1986176e4850b1d
user2:duiesnblekfn:69caac44b5ee9f8b6468b5625000723a

The main aim of password salting is to avoid mass password compromise if your database gets compromised. Password salting will make it tougher to bruteforce simple and popular passwords that are chosen by several different users.

In your case, it seems that you are generating salts randomly for registration (which is good). The mistake seems to be in the login function, where you re-calculate a random salt instead of retrieving the one that had been generated earlier and that should have been stored.

The salt you're appending to your password before hashing it needs to be the same for each user, and you need to be able to recall it when you need it. Even though it might seem contradictory, this means it has to be stored in plaintext in the database.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.