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I'm writing a small function in C that receives a char* and prints it by "slow motion", meaning each char after a certain time, thus making it look like a typing animation.

My code is:

void funnyprint(char* string)
{
  int i=0;
  int len=strlen(string);
  if(len==0)
    return;
  int k=0;
  char temp[1];
  temp[0]=string[k];
  for(i=0; i<7142800*len; i++)
  {  
    fflush(stdout);
    if((i!=0) && (i%7142800==0))
    {
      printf(temp);
      k++;
      if(k<len)
           temp[0]=string[k];
    }
  }
}

Now, the problem is it doesn't print the string, and gives partly my char* and partly a gibberish instead.

I figured out the problem is with the memory, so I tried copying "string" to a new char*, called "new". I got that code:

void funnyprint(char* string)
{
  int i=0;
  int len=strlen(string);
  if(len==0)
    return;
  int k=0;
  char temp[1];
  char * new=malloc(len*sizeof(char));
  strncpy(new,string,len);
  temp[0]=new[k];
  for(i=0; i<7142800*len; i++)
  {  
    fflush(stdout);
    if((i!=0) && (i%7142800==0))
    {
      printf(temp);
      k++;
      if(k<len)
           temp[0]=new[k];
    }
  }
}

Yet the result did not change. I'm feeling I'm missing a small issue here, would be very happy if someone can enlighten me.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
printf(temp);

your temp array is not null-terminated, hence the weird(aka undefined) behavior. I don't see the need of a char array here. It should be a single char.

char temp = string[k];

and then later

printf("%c", temp);
share|improve this answer
2  
Both ways work, thanks! – TheEmeritus May 19 '13 at 11:20
3  
How about putchar(temp)? – johnchen902 May 19 '13 at 12:12

I'd keep an eye on the integer as well, if i is a 32-bit signed int you're going to overflow it after about 300 chars. An unsigned (32-bit) int as a counter would push that back to 600, but I'd recommend using the sleep(), nanosleep(), or similar functions instead, depending on what platform / operating system you are on.

share|improve this answer
2  
Thanks, I'll keep that in mind! – TheEmeritus May 19 '13 at 11:45

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