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            var diceToRoll = [2,2]; 
            var diceRolled = new Array(); 


            function recurse(diceToRoll, diceRolled) {      
                roll = diceToRoll[0]                        
                diceLeftToRoll = diceToRoll;                
                diceLeftToRoll.shift();                 

                for(loop=1; loop<(roll+1); loop++) {    
                    result = diceRolled;                        
                    result.push(loop);                      

                    if(diceLeftToRoll.length == 0) {        
                        console.log(result);    
                        result.pop(); 
                    } else {
                        recurse(diceLeftToRoll, result);
                    }
                }
            }

            recurse(diceToRoll, diceRolled);    

I'm trying to write a recursive function which prints the possible results of any number of dice. For example, a dd100 (diceToRoll = [6, 10, 10, 100])(diceToRoll = [6, 6, 6, 6, 6]) etc. In the example I have used the simplest case(or two 2-sided dice).

I expected the results to be [1,1], [1,2], [2,1], [2,2] however it only logs [1,1], [1,2]. This is the same with any number or type of dice - only the deepest level of recursion works correctly.

I figure I'm missing something obvious in the logic of it / or misunderstanding variable scope in JavaScript, but I'm just really struggling to get my head around it.

Edit 1 (To make explanation of program's purpose clearer)

The programs purpose is to list all possible values on any number of dice. So a dice 6 implies the range of values 1..6. Likewise, a two-sided dice, 2, implies the range of values 1..2. So for two two-sided dice in the example (diceToRoll[2,2]) the possible values are 1,1 1,2 2,1 and 2,2 - which is what should be returned.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are several issues with your code:

  1. Use var keyword in order to define local variables.

  2. Assigning array to another variable not copies its content, just reference to the same array. Use Array.slice() if you want to clone array.

Here is a fixed function:

var diceToRoll = [2,2],
    diceRolled = []; 

function recurse(diceToRoll, diceRolled) {      
    var roll = diceToRoll[0],
        diceLeftToRoll = diceToRoll.slice(1),
        loop,
        result;                 

    for(loop=1; loop<=roll; loop++) {    
        result = diceRolled.slice(0);                        
        result.push(loop);                      

        if(diceLeftToRoll.length === 0) {        
            console.log(result);    
            result.pop(); 
        } else {
            recurse(diceLeftToRoll, result);
        }
    }
}

recurse(diceToRoll, diceRolled);

NOTE

diceToRoll = diceToRoll.slice(1)

is equivalent to

diceToRoll = diceToRoll.slice(0);
diceToRoll.shift();

Fiddle here: http://jsbin.com/isebef/1/edit

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure I understand what difference the changes made which caused it to work now... If you don't mind could you explain please? – Eilidh May 19 '13 at 14:33
1  
@ShimmerGeek Ok, here are my changes explanation: changing new Array() to [] is for better performance, instead of multiple var declarations I made one and separated variables with , - its nice to have; I extracted all local variables of recurse to the beginning of closure in order to make scope more understandable; I changed loop<(rool+1) to loop<=rool; I changed diceLeftToRoll = diceToRoll; diceLeftToRoll.shift(); to diceToRoll.slice(1) - this is one of major changes as well as changing result = diceRolled to diceRolled.slice(0), I changed == to === as well. – Vadim May 19 '13 at 14:44

You must declare "roll" (and other local variables) with var.

        function recurse(diceToRoll, diceRolled) {      
            var roll = diceToRoll[0]                        
            var diceLeftToRoll = diceToRoll;                
            diceLeftToRoll.shift();                 

            for(var loop=1; loop<(roll+1); loop++) {    
                var result = diceRolled;                        
                result.push(loop);                      

                if(diceLeftToRoll.length == 0) {        
                    console.log(result);    
                    result.pop(); 
                } else {
                    recurse(diceLeftToRoll, result);
                }
            }
        }

Without var, "roll" and "loop" are global.

I'm not sure what the point of "result" is; it's just a reference to the "diceRolled" array, so I'm not sure why you wouldn't just use that.

edit — I'm not sure exactly what your code is trying to do here, but another significant problem is this:

      var diceLeftToRoll = diceToRoll;
      diceLeftToRoll.shift();

When you make an assignment like that of a value that's a reference to an array, you do not make a copy of the array. Thus both variables refer to the same array object, and the first element will be removed from it. If you instead make "diceLeftToRoll" a copy of the other array, then things work differently:

      var diceLeftToRoll = diceToRoll.slice(1); // copy all but 1st element

I don't think the whole thing will work, however, because I now think that the "result" variable was an attempt to do something similar.

edit again Here is an alternative version that returns results in a list. This one avoids making copies except for the final entries added to the result.

function allRolls( dice ) {
  var list = [], rolled = [];

  function roll( dn ) {
      var dp = rolled.length;
      for (var dv = 1; dv <= dice[dn]; ++dv) {
        rolled[dp] = dv;
        if (dn < dice.length - 1)
          roll(dn + 1)
        else
          list.push(rolled.slice(0));
      }
      rolled.length = dp;
  }

  if (dice.length) roll(0);

  return list;
}

allRolls([3, 3, 3]);

The function involves an inner function that does all the work. It's passed the index in the "dice" list of a dice to roll; initially, that's 0.

The function keeps track of two other lists: the accumulated possible rolls, and an array representing the "rolled so far" for use by the recursive inner function.

At each recursive level, the function iterates through the faces of the current dice (that is, dice[dn]). Each iteration places that dice value in a slot at the end of the "rolled" array; the same slot is used for each iteration. Now, if the loop notices that "dn" represents the last dice in the list, then it makes a copy of the "rolled" array and adds it to the result list. If not, then it makes a recursive call, passing the next dice index down.

The outer function then just checks to see if there are any dice to roll, and rolls them if so. It returns the accumulated list.

share|improve this answer
    
I have changed roll and loop, however this has no effect on the result. – Eilidh May 19 '13 at 14:00
    
@ShimmerGeek sorry I missed "diceLeftToRoll". All your local variables need to be declared as such with var! – Pointy May 19 '13 at 14:01
    
Even with all three variables declared in this way the results are the same for me? – Eilidh May 19 '13 at 14:02
    
@ShimmerGeek yes ok hold on; there are other problems I think. – Pointy May 19 '13 at 14:02
    
I actually tried declaring the variables this way before because I thought it might be a scope issue but it had no effect - sorry, I should have posted that in my original question! – Eilidh May 19 '13 at 14:03

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